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Striking Stories about Family! November 2015 Intermediate Titles

October 23rd, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | November | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Striking Stories about Family! November 2015 Intermediate Titles)

arcady's goalArcady’s Goal by Eugene Yelchin. Henry Holt, 2014.Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readers

Young Arcady is living in an orphanage in the Soviet Union in 1950, and soccer is his answer for everything. When Ivan Ivanyvich adopts him, Arcady assumes the man must be a soccer coach. In truth, Ivan is simply a sad, lonely widower trying to fulfill a promise by adopting a child. He is patient, loving, and occasionally annoyed, but Arcady is so convinced he’s a coach that Ivan finally plays along. He forms a team, he tries to coach Arcady and the other boys, and he fails. Then comes word that the Red Army soccer team is holding tryouts, and Arcady is determined to attend. Eugene Yelchin’s novel is about a boy and a man who are learning to become a family. The disconnect between Ivan’s understanding of this and Arcady’s absolute blindness to it is both funny and tender. Arcady first calls the Ivan “Coach,” and, when he proves to be no coach, Ivan Ivanyvich. When Arcady, who is also learning that it’s safe to feel, and that love can be unconditional, finally calls him “Dad” it feels like something far sweeter than victory. Occasional black-and-white illustrations by the author offer additional moments of poignancy in a story set against the backdrop of Stalinism, with the fear under which so many lived occasionally bubbling up to the surface.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: What makes a family?
  2. This story takes place in Communist Soviet Union in the 1950’s. How does this setting help explain the characters’ actions?
  3. Why does Arcady believe Ivan is a soccer coach? What makes Arcady believe this?
  4. How does the author show that Arcady is learning to trust Ivan? What causes Ivan to open up to Arcady?

Teaching guide and more from TeachingBooks.net.

Kinda Like Brothers by Coe Booth. Scholastic Press, 2014.kinda like brothers

Eleven-year-old Jarrett and twelve-year-old Kevon are thrown together when Jarrett’s mom becomes a temporary foster parent to Kevon and his two-year-old sister. Jarrett is sometimes resentful of how much time his mom spends taking care of other children, but they’re usually babies and toddlers that he genuinely likes. This is different. Kevon is cool in a way Jarrett isn’t, inviting easy admiration from other kids. In Jarrett’s mind, that makes Kevon a potential threat socially, not to mention someone with whom he has to share his room. Meanwhile Kevon resents the implication that he can’t care for his sister—a responsibility he’s used to–and worries about his mentally ill dad. He has no time for Jarrett’s jealousy. Author Coe Booth’s characters are likable, genuine, and flawed in all the ways that make us human. Adults and kids alike in her story are well-rounded and wonderfully real. The two boys’ have good hearts but their treatment of each other ranges from bright moments of generosity to indifference to cruelty. The larger community—from Jarrett’s mom and her boyfriend to teachers at school and adults at the community center–strives to make a difference in the lives of these boys and other children, preparing them for a world that is not always fair or just. But for Jarrett and Kevon to make peace with one another they must let go of anger and hurt, and acknowledge the bond that has developed between them in spite—or because—of everything.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What makes Jarrett and Kevon kind of like brothers?
  2. How did the author use foreshadowing in the narrative? Cite examples.
  3. How do Jarrett’s feelings about Kevon change? At what point in the story, did you notice these changes?
  4. How would this story be different if told from Kevon’s perspective? What makes you think this?
  5. What role does community play in this story?

Discussion questions, excerpts from book and audiobook, and other resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Explore Emotions with November 2015 Primary Titles

October 23rd, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | November | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Explore Emotions with November 2015 Primary Titles)

bullyBully by Laura Vaccaro Seeger.  A Neal Porter BookPrimary Icon of a White-Tailed Deer/ Roaring Brook Press, 2013.

Not a bully but a bull takes center stage in Laura Vaccaro Seeger’s visually eloquent look at name-calling and insults. “Go away!” a big bull tells a smaller one, the rejection unmistakable on the small bull’s face. When the small bull is then approached by a group of animals inviting him to play, he puffs himself up and says, “No!” But he doesn’t stop there. He calls the chicken a chicken. He calls the turtle a slow poke. He calls the pig a pig. His anger intensifies each time, and even though the words at face value are generally factual (a chicken is a chicken and a pig is a pig, after all), intent is everything here. When a billy goat counters with a name of his own for the bull, everything changes. “Bully!” Suddenly the bull, which had been growing larger with each insult he hurled, deflates. Despite its seemingly obvious message, Seeger’s book is leaves plenty of space for readers of the words and pictures to observe, reflect upon, and discuss the characters’ thoughts, feelings, and actions. The spare text is comprised only of the words the animals exchange, while the bold illustrations are simple in composition but complex in terms of gesture and feeling. (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Teaching ideas and guides, book trailer, and author interviews for Bully at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Why do you think the bull picks on the other animals? Which animal makes the bull change?
  2. What does the bull say to insult the animals? How do these words relate to the specific animal being insulted? How are these words insulting and not insulting to the animals?
  3. Why do you think the illustrator shows the bull growing larger with each animal it teases?

Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla byivan the remarkable true story Katherine Applegate. Illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Clarion, 2014.

“In leafy calm, in gentle arms, a gorilla’s life begins.” The baby gorilla learned as he played in the tropical forest of central Africa. He learned, too, by watching and listening to his mother and his father and other gorillas. But he didn’t learn about humans until he was captured by poachers and shipped in a crate with another baby gorilla to the United States. “A man who owned a shopping mall had ordered and paid for them, like a couple of pizzas, like a pair of shoes.” They were given names in a contest: Burma and Ivan. Then Burma died and Ivan was alone. He learned how to do things humans do—hold babies, sleep in a bed—but not the things that gorillas do. Eventually, he was too big to do anything but live a cage at the mall, with a TV, some art supplies, and a tire. After many years, people began to get angry on Ivan’s behalf. After twenty-seven years in a cage, he was finally moved, to Zoo Atlanta, a safe haven where he was released into the open air again. “In leafy calm, in gentle arms, a gorilla’s life begins again.” Katherine Applegate tells the story of the gorilla that inspired her Newbery-award-winning The One and Only Ivan in this lyrical and moving picture book tenderly illustrated by G. Brian Karas. A two-page photo essay at story’s end tells more about Ivan.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Teaching guides and a dedicated website for Ivan available through TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: How would you feel if you had to live in a shopping mall?
  2. What are some differences between Ivan’s life in the jungle and in captivity?
  3. How do the author and illustrator show you how Ivan feels throughout the story?
  4. Why do you think the shopping center owner let Ivan leave? What in the text and illustrations shows you this?

Counting and More: November 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

October 23rd, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | November | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Counting and More: November 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

gastonGaston by Kelly DiPucchio.  Illustrated by ChristianIcon_PreSchool Robinson.  Atheneum, 2014.

Mrs. Poodle is the proud parent of Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, Ooh-La-La, and Gaston. The first three are spitting images of their mother. And Gaston — well, he clearly comes from different stock. Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, Ooh-La-La are poofy and puffy and the size of teacups, while Gaston is solid and stocky and as big as a teapot. But if being dainty and delicate and neat like their mother doesn’t come as easily to Gaston, he always “worked the hardest, practiced the longest, and smiled the biggest.” Then the family meets Rocky, Ricky, and Bruno, three stocky, solid bulldog pups, and their poofy, puffy sister, Antoinette. “It seems there’s been a terrible mistake,” says Mrs. Bulldog. And so the two puppies trade places. The problem is, “Antoinette did not like anything proper or precious or pink.” And Gaston didn’t like anything “brutish or brawny or brown.” Kelly DiPuccio’s delightful romp gets even better as the pups return to their original families, and eventually have pups of their own who are encouraged to be whatever they want to be. It’s a tongue-in-cheek look at nature versus nurture, but also an affirmation of being true to oneself.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Talk about manners. What are examples of good manners? “Oui” is the French word for yes. What other ways can you say “yes”?
  • Write: Draw a map of your home and label the different rooms.
  • Play: Play a matching game or game of memory.
  • STEM:Challenge your senses by comparing and contrasting different textures. Look at the illustrations in the book. How are the dogs the same and how are they different?

We All Count: A Book of Cree Numbers by Julie Flett. Native Northwest, 2014.we all count cover

Read a review by Debbie Reese from her blog, American Indians in Children’s Literature.

Check out this book trailer from the iSchool at The University of British Columbia.

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Read: Find other books about the animals shown in this book.
  • Talk: What languages do you speak? Who are the people in your family? Do you have cousins, aunts, uncles?
  • STEM: Point and count as your share the book. Count to 10 with your child.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Find ROW November Titles Here!

October 19th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | November | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Find ROW November Titles Here!)

Click on an image to read the CCBC annotation for the title. Check earlier posts below for discussion prompts and resources! And, Read! On Wisconsin!

we all count covergastonbully

 

 

ivan the remarkable true storyarcady's goalkinda like brothers

etched in claymad pottertin star

 

Read On Wisconsin Posters! With Free Downloads!

October 13th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Read On Wisconsin Posters! With Free Downloads!)

Check out our posters for this year’s Read On Wisconsin reading program! Please feel free to download these posters for printing and sharing in your library as well as for use in social media, websites, and other media! Find downloadables below.

Read On Wisconsin poster of Michala Johnson with Kwame Alexander's The Crossover

 

Thanks to Badgers Give Back, the University of Wisconsin Athletics and the Men’s and Women’s Basketball teams we have two excellent reading ambassadors in our posters: Michala Johnson from the UW Women’s Basketball team and Wisconsin high school basketball stand-out, Zak Showalter of the UW Men’s Basketball team. Of course, Michala and Zak are enjoyingRead On Wisconsin poster of Zak Showalter with Jason Chin's Gravity two of our fabulous Read On Wisconsin titles in the posters.

 

Multi-award winner Kwame Alexander’s The Crossover (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt, 2014) and Jason Chin’s Gravity (Roaring Brook Press, 2014). Fitting books for basketball players, don’t you think?!

A big thank you to Anna Lewis, director of MERIT, and photographer, John Sable, generously photographed and designed the posters.

 

 

Michala Johnson with The Crossover 8.5×11 pdf

Michala Johnson with The Crossover 8.5×11 jpeg

Michala Johnson with The Crossover 11×17 pdf

Michala Johnson with The Crossover 11×17 jpeg

Zak Showalter with Gravity 8.5×11 pdf

Zak Showalter with Gravity 8.5×11 jpeg

Zak Showalter with Gravity 11×17 pdf

Zak Showalter with Gravity 11×17 jpeg

 

Please read and follow our Terms of Use below for this year’s ROW posters.

Terms of Use:

Permitted Uses of the 2015 Read On Wisconsin Poster:

  • Use as printed promotional material distributed to Wisconsin students, educators, librarians and library patrons.
  • Use as digital promotional material on school and library websites, social media sites, and video screens in schools and libraries in Wisconsin.

Prohibited or Restricted Uses of the 2015 Read On Wisconsin Poster:

  • No alteration other than changing the size of the poster is permitted. 

Find Out What Really Happened: October 2015 High School Title

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | 2015-2016 | High School - (Comments Off on Find Out What Really Happened: October 2015 High School Title)

how it went downHow It Went Down by Kekla Magoon. Henry Holt, 2014.Icon_HighSchool

The murder of African American teenager Tariq Johnson and its aftermath is experienced through the voices of witnesses, family members, and his best friend, Tyrell. Two facts are clear: A white man got out of his car and shot Tariq. The police have let that man go free. The rest is conflicting perceptions: Had Tariq just robbed a neighborhood store? (The store owner says no, but his voice is lost in the rush to assume the worst.) Did Tariq have a gun or a Snickers bar in his hand? (Even the two teens from the neighborhood standing close to him disagree.) Meanwhile, as the story hits the news, much of the attention from the media focuses not on the murder but on questions about whether Tariq was a member of the Kings, a neighborhood gang. Tariq and his best friends from childhood all swore they’d never join. Two already have; Junior is even in prison. Tyrell thought Tariq and he were staying strong; now he’s not so sure. But he is sure that Tariq’s death will make it much harder for him to not be drawn or forced into that life. Meanwhile Jennica, who did CPR on Tariq, and whose boyfriend Noodle is in the gang, is desperate to escape her current life. Kekla Magoon’s fearless, tragic, poignant novel examines racism, poverty, violence, and how mightily all of these can trap youth by limiting their options — real and perceived. Not every question is answered outright, but Magoon provides evidence for readers to decide for themselves while adding her voice to the urgent call to acknowledge and address racism and violence.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find teaching guides and ideas and more at Teaching.Books.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Using evidence from the text, explain one character’s perspective of how it went down.
  2. What is Tina’s (the little sister) role in the story? Why does Magoon include non-witness characters like her?
  3. After having read this book, how will this novel effect your view of events in real life similar to those in this novel?

Enjoy Some Haunting Tales: October 2015 Middle School Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | 2015-2016 | Middle School - (Comments Off on Enjoy Some Haunting Tales: October 2015 Middle School Titles)

swallowThe Swallow: A Ghost Story by Charis Cotter. Tundra Books for Middle School AgeBooks, 2014.

Polly often feels lost in the chaos of her big family. But she’s fiery and feisty and doesn’t have trouble speaking her mind. Quiet only child Rose feels invisible. Her parents think about work even when they’re home in the house to which they recently moved, which once belonged to Rose’s grandmother. Polly, who loves ghost stories, wonders if Rose, who can see ghosts, might not be a ghost herself: Rose is pale and wild-looking. Rose’s attempts to convince Polly she’s a real girl recovering from meningitis are temporarily set back when they discover a grave stone with Rose’s name. The girl, the same age as Rose, died years before. Rose realizes this Winifred Rose must be her aunt, and soon encounters the ghost of Winifred at home. Winifred is not only an unhappy ghost, she’s a dangerous one and seems intent on hurting Polly in particular. The two girls are determined to figure out what happened to Winifred and form a deepening friendship as they dig into the past, each finding the companionship and validation they need, each understanding themselves and their families better for knowing one another. Charis Cotter’s satisfyingly scary ghost story, set in 1963 Toronto, is also, and at its most essential, a moving tale of friendship that ends with a revelation.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources for The Swallow at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Fear is a recurring theme in this story. What are the different kinds of fears that the characters experience? How does this affect the pace and tension in the story?
  1. Explain the way that different characters in the story feel invisible.
  1. The swallow is a symbol throughout the book. What does the swallow represent? What is the significance of the swallow? Why do you think the author used the title, The Swallow?

The Screaming Staircase. (Lockwood & Co.: Book One) by screaming staircseJonathan Stroud. Disney / Hyperion, 2013.

In this parallel universe, London residents are at risk from hostile “Visitors”—aka ghosts. Adults lack the ability to see ghosts, so it’s left to young people to put up a fight. Several agencies (think private eye meets Ghostbusters ) serve Britain in this capacity. Lockwood and Company, run by charismatic Anthony Lockwood along with studious George Cubbins and risk-taking Lucy Carlyle, is the only agency without an adult supervisor and as such is viewed as unreliable and rebellious. Lucy narrates her early career with Lockwood and Co. as their clever and brave attempts at ghost removal often end in botched results, lending credence to their detractors’ claims. Eventually they are driven to accept a high-risk, high-reward job in order to repay debts and save their company’s reputation after one of their investigations goes horribly wrong. This smart middle-grade adventure, alternately funny and scary with fallible characters that grow emotionally and intellectually, sets the stage for the continuing escapades of Lockwood and Company.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find lesson plans, a book trailer and more at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. In what time period do you think this story is set? What evidence can you cite?
  1. Secrecy is a theme in this book. How do the secrets affect the plot? How do the secrets affect the development of the characters?
  1. This book’s setting mixes fantasy and realism by imagining that ghosts are real. How do the fantasy aspects of this book affect the realistic parts of the world?

Exploring and Challenging Inequalities: October 2015 Intermediate Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Exploring and Challenging Inequalities: October 2015 Intermediate Titles)

separate is never equalBoth of this month’s books talk about inequality? How do the authors show the inequalities? How do the inequalities affect the main characters’ communities? How are communities different due to inequalities?

Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersfor Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams, 2014.

In 1944, Sylvia Mendez’s Mexican American family had recently moved. She and her siblings were not allowed to go to the public school nearest their farm and were instead told they had to attend the Mexican school, which was farther away and had fewer resources. Sylvia’s father found other families willing to join him in suing the school district, whose only explanation had been, “That is how it is done.” During the trial, Sylvia and her family sat through infuriating testimony in which school district officials blatantly claimed that Mexican children were inferior to white children — in their personal habits, their social abilities, and their intelligence. Author/illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh quotes from the trial as part of this narrative that is grounded in both facts and the emotional experience of young Sylvia. The ample end matter includes a lengthy author’s note with additional information and photographs of Sylvia then and now. A glossary, bibliography, and index round out this distinctively illustrated picture book account of the events surrounding the court case that desegregated California schools seven years before Brown v. Board of Education.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find reader’s theater, various teaching guides, Common Core guide and more for this title at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Why is separate never equal? What are some examples of this from the story?
  2. How do the illustrations help tell the story?
  3. What changes from the start of the story to the end of the story?

The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis. Scholastic Press, 2014.madman of piney woods

In 1901, thirteen-year-old African American Benji, an aspiring newspaper reporter, lives with his parents and younger twin siblings in the Black Canadian town of Buxton. Thirteen-year-old Irish American Red, an aspiring scientist, lives in nearby Chatham with his father and immigrant grandmother. Benji gets work in Chatham as an apprentice at a Black-owned newspaper, where the demanding, good-humored woman owner shapes his talent as a writer (Benji is prone to high drama and alliteration). Meanwhile, patience-tested Red is gaining insight into his unlikable, bitter grandmother, who was scarred by her experiences in the Irish famine and the trauma she faced as a new immigrant. Red thinks it should make her particularly sensitive to racism; instead, she is hateful and bigoted. The boys are drawn together by their good hearts, humor, intelligence, and fascination with differences in how they think about the world. Meanwhile, the man the people Buxton call the Madman in the Woods and the people of Chatham call the South Woods Lion Man is Cooter Bixby, an old friend of Benji’s parents whose experiences in the Civil War left him emotionally damaged. Benji’s encounters transform his understanding of the Madman from frightening figure to kindred spirit–someone else completely at home in nature–while Red’s experience leaves him certain the Lion Man, although eccentric, is good hearted. In a stand-alone, companion novel to Elijah of Buxton, Benji and Red’s friendship, organic and wonderful, represents hope even as it comes into full relief during a tragedy mired in wrong ways of thinking. Christopher Paul Curtis has once again penned a novel of high humor and exquisite grace.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find interviews with Christopher Paul Curtis about writing Madman of Piney Woods, Common Core guide from Scholastic and more at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these prompts:

  1. This story is told from the perspective of two different characters, Benji and Red. How would the story be different if it was told by Grandma O’Toole or the Madman of Piney Woods?
  2. How do the traumatic experiences in Grandma O’Toole’s and the Madman’s lives affect them, their families and their communities? How do these experiences change the choices each makes in life? How are the grandmother and the madman alike? How are the different?
  3. How does the setting of the book help in the development of the characters and the difference in their experiences?

Join the Adventure: October 2015 Primary Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Join the Adventure: October 2015 Primary Titles)

sam and dave dig a holeSam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett. Illustrated by Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerJon Klassen. Candlewick Press, 2014.

Sam and Dave are on a mission: They plan to keep digging until they “find something spectacular.” When digging straight down doesn’t yield results, they turn to the right. Then they split up. They come back together and start digging down again. They take a rest. And all along, their dog — and readers and listeners — understand what they don’t: they keep missing one spectacular thing after another. The straightforward narrative is the foil for the marvelous visual storytelling in a hilarious picture book in which Sam and Dave manage to miss gemstone after gemstone, each one bigger and more spectacular than the one before. The last one is so big the page can’t show it all. When they stop to rest again, dirty and done in by their effort, they are mere inches above a bone. While Sam and Dave sleep the dog starts digging and suddenly all of them are falling … falling … falling … only to land right back where they began … or do they? Brilliantly conceptualized and illustrated, this is truly a book for all ages.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find book trailers, story hour kit and other resources for this title at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading the book: What are some reasons why Sam and Dave would want to dig a hole?
  2. In the pictures, how is the place where Sam and Dave begin their adventure different from where they end up?
  3. The characters say, “We won’t stop digging until we find something spectacular?” What do you consider spectacular? Did they find something spectacular? What about the dog, did it find something spectacular?
  4. What story does the text tell? What story do the pictures tell? How are they different?

Gravity by Jason Chin. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press,gravity 2014.

In an engaging introduction to gravity, a day at the beach unexpectedly turns into a surprising science lesson. In the first few pages, a young cape-clad boy plays with his spaceman and rocket ship on the rocky beach until he discovers a book on gravity. The boy is drawn into the book and soon his toys and other earthly objects are illustrating gravitational principles. The toy spaceman, rocket ship, pail, and shovel, along with a nearby pitcher of lemonade, spin above the earth. Jason Chin explains that without gravity the moon and the sun, just like the toys, would drift away from the earth. “Gravity keeps the earth near the sun, the moon near the earth,” and gravity also keeps objects on the earth. Punctuated text — a few short words per page — provides an accessible definition of gravity and its effects. The accompanying illustrations complement and reinforce the text while the story offers humor and a narrative structure in this simplified, but not diminished, explanation of a complex concept.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find STEM and literacy resources for Jason Chin’s Gravity at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts?

  1. This book is about gravity. What does this book want us to know about gravity?
  2. How do the illustrations help you to understand gravity?
  3. This book combines fiction and non-fiction to relay information and to tell a story. Which parts do you think are fiction? Which parts are nonfiction? Why?

October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | October | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

shh! we have a planShh! We Have a Plan by Chris Haughton. U.S. edition: Candlewick Icon_PreSchoolPress, 2014.

Four wide-eyed hunters are trying to catch a bird in a net. Make that three hunters; the fourth—and smallest–member of their party just wants to be friendly (“Hello, birdie.”). The group’s comical, not-so-stealthy pursuit of the bird features one failed attempt after another, with a pattern emerging as the youngest one greets the bird, the others shush their small companion (“We have a plan”), and then counting to three before they pounce….on nothing as the bird has already flown away. The spare, droll narrative is set against marvelous visual storytelling. The stylized illustrations are in shades of deep blue with black and white, against which the brightly colored red bird stands out. Young readers and listeners will be reciting along and laughing out loud, with the delight heightened by two big surprises as the story draws to a close.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Shh! We Have a Plan at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask children why the character with the plan kept saying “Shh!”
  • Play: Hide a toy and give your child some clues as to where it may be. Now have your child hide a toy and give you the clues.
  • STEM: Take a walk with children and look for animals. How many different type of animals did you see? Talk  about how the animals are similar and how they are different.

Go, Shapes, Go! by Denise Fleming.  Beach Lane, 2014.go shapes go

A small toy mouse on wheels commandingly directs a variety of shapes — squares, circles, ovals, arcs, and rectangles — in different sizes — big, small, thin, tiny — to slide, roll, flip, and fly into the form of a monkey. When the mouse suddenly crashes into the monkey, the shapes reform into a bounding cat. Mouse quickly tames the shapes back into the safer monkey mode. Denise Fleming’s trademark painted-paper collage, uncomplicated text, and comfortable pace make this book an engaging introduction to shapes, sizes, and movement for younger children, as well as to the concepts of parts and wholes, as separate shapes create concrete objects.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Go, Shapes, Go! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Letter knowledge begins with shapes. What shape does the letter A look like? Think about other letters and their corresponding shapes.
  • Write: Draw shapes in sand, shaving cream or pudding
  • Play: Act out the actions from this book – slide, bounce, roll, slither, flip, march, leap, scoot, fly, twirl, hop!
  • STEM: Discuss the different shapes you see in this book and talk about the shapes you see in your daily lives.

i am so braveI Am So Brave by Stephen Krensky. Abrams Appleseed, 2014.

In this slim board book, a young brown-skinned boy tells of overcoming his fears. Each fear is resolved in a way that allows the boy to feel safe, content, and brave. The boy’s obvious pride at overcoming his fears is reflected in the straightforward text and bright graphic-design-style illustrations in primary colors with brown, black, and white. Many of the boy’s fears are common childhood worries — barking dogs, loud traffic noises, bedtime darkness, being separated from Mom and Dad — that all parents and children will easily recognize. The boy’s solutions to his fears offer positive, encouraging responses to the anxiety that many children may feel in new or uncomfortable situations.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for I Am So Brave! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask your child what they can do now that they couldn’t do when they were younger. How does that make you feel to be able to do all of those things now?
  • Sing: “If You’re Happy and You Know It”. Replace happy with different emotion words like grumpy, scared, or excited.
  • Play: Take turns with children acting out different emotions and guessing the emotions.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Our October Titles!

September 18th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | October | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Our October Titles!)

Find out more about these titles! Click on the book cover to read the annotation! Check out resources from TeachingBooks.net for links to teaching guides, videos, author interviews and more for all of the titles below! And, now, check out the posts below for discussion prompts, annotations, and prompts for each title.

Cover for book i am so braveBook cover to go shapes gobook cover of Shh! We Have a Planbook cover for sam and dave dig a holebook cover for gravity

book cover for separate is never equal

book cover for madman of piney woodsswallowscreaming staircsehow it went down

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start the School Year with Compelling, Realistic Fiction: ROW High School September 2015 Selection

August 28th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in September | 2015-2016 | High School - (Comments Off on Start the School Year with Compelling, Realistic Fiction: ROW High School September 2015 Selection)

milk of birdsThe Milk of Birds by Sylvia Whitman. Icon_HighSchoolAtheneum, 2013.

Here are some the reasons that our High School Literacy Advisory Committee chose The Milk of Birds as a ROW selection. … the story draws you in with its appealing writing and sympathetic characters; the author offers believable school struggles; characters’ reactions felt realistic and authentic; learned a lot about the refugee experience and Darfur but book never felt didactic.

Read the CCBC annotation:

Nawra is a fourteen-year-old Muslim girl living in a refugee camp in the Darfur region of Sudan. Through a nonprofit called Save the Girls, she is paired with K.C., a Richmond, Virginia, teen, to exchange monthly letters. A novel that moves back and forth between the two girls chronicles their correspondence and their lives. In the camp, where living conditions are awful, Nawra cares for her silent and barely functional mother, who has been traumatized by what she and Nawra have gone through—events that are gradually revealed. Eventually Nawra tells K.C. that she’s pregnant—she was raped on their journey. Later she almost dies giving birth. K.C. is initially furious her mother signed her up for the correspondence program and doesn’t write Nawra for the first four months. She struggles in school with undiagnosed learning disabilities and faces constant pressure from her mom to try harder, while her dad seems uninterested. Sylvia Whitman’s novel is effective and compelling on multiple fronts. Both girls try to understand each other’s culture without judgment. But the truth is their experiences are vastly different. Once K.C. begins exchanging letters with Nawra in earnest, a genuine friendship develops, and she goes from reluctant correspondent to a teenager deeply moved. The pain of Nawra’s story is intense, but her voice is engaging and vivid, and the back-and-forth of the narrative provides respite from the horrors she sometimes describes.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start discussion with these questions:

  1. What events and actions contribute to Casey’s change of heart regarding the “Save the Girls” program?
  2. How does the author suggest that taking action, either for yourself or others, makes a difference? Conversely, what are the consequences of being a bystander? Provide examples from the text.
  3. Which one of Nawra’s proverbs is most relevant to the problems of teenagers today?
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