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May 2015 Titles for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: A Month of Discovery!

May 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | May - (Comments Off on May 2015 Titles for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: A Month of Discovery!)

max and the tag-along moonBTPMax and the Tag Along Moon by Floyd Cooper. Philomel, 2013.

Max discovers the moon is a constant companion on the drive home from his Granpa’s house. “The long ride home was swervy-curvy. This way and that, all the way. And the moon seemed to tag along.” Wonderful word choice chronicles Max’s journey home with the moon overhead, until “Dark clouds tumbled across the night sky.” The moon his Granpa said would always shine for him has disappeared. But as he’s falling asleep, the clouds fade and the moon returns. Floyd Cooper captures the magic of the moon and a grandparent to a small child in this picture book about a young African American boy. Cooper’s hallmark illustration style is especially adept at reflecting the wonder of moonlit landscapes. Highly Commended, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start a conversation with children about the Max and the Tag-Along Moon:

1. How does Max feel when he says goodbye to Grandpa?

2. Why can’t Max see the moon? Why does the moon disappear in the story?

3. Find the arrows on Max’s ride home.

wait! wait!

Wait! Wait! by Hatsue Nakawaki. Translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko. Illustrated by Komako Sakai. U.S. edition: Enchanted Lion, 2013.

A series of typical toddler encounters are captured in a few simple lines of text accompanying illustrations that excel at depicting both the fascination and frustration that are part of a toddler’s experience. The story is told in pairs of page spreads. Over the course of the picture book, the young child on the cover notices a butterfly, a lizard, and two pigeons. “Wait! Wait!” But just as the child gets closer, the creatures flutter or wiggle or flap away. Help finally comes in the form of a grown-up, who picks the child up to ride, shoulder-high. Hatsue Nakawaki’s art has a nostalgic but not sentimental feel, and masterfully reflects the physical relationship of small children to the world around them. There is rich word choice in the spare text.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Engage children during or after reading Wait! Wait! with these prompts:

1. Where did the animals go?

2. Point to the flowers.

3. Which animals can fly?

nino wrestles the worldBTP

Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2013.

A young, masked, underwear-clad boy takes on one opponent after another as he imagines the toys strewn on his floor as full-size wrestling rivals. Luckily, Niño has a series of patented moves to guarantee victory. He does in the Guanajuato Mummy with the Tickle Tackle. Olmec Head is defeated by the Puzzle Muzzle move. And El Chamuco is ruined with the Popsickle Slick. But the ticking clock warns of coming dread: “His sisters’ nap is over. Time for Niño to tangle with Las Hermanitas!” Has Niño met his match in these two darling, diaper-clad girls? A vibrant picture book that integrates Spanish words and expressions into the English text is a dynamic and engaging portrait of a child’s pretend play. Full of energy and humor, Yuyi Morales’s words and pictures will have young readers and listeners cheering. An author’s note provides information about Lucha libre, a “theatrical, action-packed style of professional wrestling that’s popular throughout Mexico and many Spanish-speaking countries.” Niño’s story is rich with specific cultural references but universal in appeal. Among the elements adding to the fun are endpapers offering profiles of Niño and all his opponents. Highly Commended, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center.

Continue the fun and adventure of reading Niño Wrestles the World with these questions:

Icon_PreSchool1. How do you use your imagination when you play?

2. Do you pretend to be other people or characters? Who do you like to pretend to be?

3. The author attended  the Lucha Libre wrestling matches with her dad when she was a little girl. Is there some special activity you like to do with a family member?

Big Impact of Diverse Books: Student Interview with Mitali Perkins

April 29th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in 2014-2015 | High School | January | April - (Comments Off on Big Impact of Diverse Books: Student Interview with Mitali Perkins)

Author Mitali Perkins and Middleton High School student, Ali Khan, shared thoughts on race, humor and her book, Open Mic: Riffs on Life Between Cultures in Ten Voices (Candlewick, 2013), during an interview in March 2015. Mitali’s addition of humor to discussions of race in her book has positively impacted Ali’s life and his approach to communicating ideas about culture and politics. This is an excerpt from that interview.

ROW 2015-2016 Titles Coming in May!

April 29th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in 2015-2016 | May - (Comments Off on ROW 2015-2016 Titles Coming in May!)

The Read On Wisconsin Literacy Advisory Committee will be meeting on May 9th to select next year’s titles for Read On Wisconsin! At this annual meeting, the members come together to discuss books and select titles for our upcoming year. Stay tuned to learn more about the selection process and be sure to check back in late May for the new ROW titles.

Coming Soon! Interview with Mitali Perkins

April 26th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in 2014-2015 | High School | January | April - (Comments Off on Coming Soon! Interview with Mitali Perkins)

In March 2015, Ali Khan, a senior at Middleton High School, interviewed author Mitali Perkins about her book, Open Mic: Riffs on Life Between Cultures in Ten Voices (Candlewick, 2013). As part of a book trailer project with Simpson Street Free Press, Madison Public Library, and Read On Wisconsin, Ali created a book trailer of Open Mic. Mitali’s approach to adding humor to discussions of race strongly resonated with Ali. Fortunately, we were able to bring Mitali and Ali together on Skype to share thoughts on the book, racial identity, and humor. Check back soon to see excerpts from the interview! In the meantime, enjoy Ali’s book trailer for Mitali Perkin’s Open Mic.

Brand New! Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors!

April 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Brand New! Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors!)

This month we started a trial program called Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors! We’ll have different youth services librarians from across Wisconsin showcase some of the engaging, educational and easy ways that they are integrating Read On Wisconsin titles into their library programming and outreach.

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Heide Piehler, Youth Service Librarian, shares one of April’s R.O.W. titles Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore during the Shorewood Public Library Preschool Story Time.

For April 2015, our ROW Ambassador is Heide Piehler from the Shorewood Public Library.

Here’s what Heide told us about her storytime with April 2015 ROW titles, Lucky Duckling by Eva Moore: “I read stories about lost ducklings. We compared the pictures of the traffic stop in Lucking Ducklings to the one in Make Way for Ducklings. I had also printed photos of actual duckling rescues to demonstrate how a story in a book can be based on an actual event. …

 Heide Piehler, Youth Service Librarian, shares one of April’s R.O.W. titles Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore during the Shorewood Public Library Preschool Story Time.

Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore, one of the April R.O.W titles, is featured in Shorewood Library’s duck-themed preschool story time.

 

In between stories, we did duck themed finger games and sang duck themed songs like Six Little Ducks. We also talked about we’d name ducks and created ducks with “feathers in the back” out of peep chicks.” 

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Inspired by the R.O.W. featured book Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore and the song Six Little Ducks, Shorewood Library’s story time preschoolers create their own little ducks with “feathers in the back.”

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Duck “with the feathers in the back” Peep!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Heide Piehler and the Shorewood Public Library for the time, creativity, extra work and photos!

April Showers bring May Flowers and Books!

April 23rd, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in General | 2014-2015 - (Comments Off on April Showers bring May Flowers and Books!)

Check out the April 2015 ROW titles and discussion questions below.

High School Title for April: More Than This

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in 2014-2015 | High School | April - (Comments Off on High School Title for April: More Than This)

more than thisMore Than This by Patrick Ness. U.S. edition: Candlewick Press, 2013.

Teenage Seth drowns in the chilly waters of the Pacific Northwest only to awaken, feeble and dehydrated, in the long abandoned house of his British childhood. Trying to make sense of the inexplicable world in which he’s found himself—the entire town appears lifeless—Seth struggles to find the basic necessities he needs to survive. He meets teenage Regine and young Tomasz on one of his scrounging forays, and they warn him about the Driver, a menacing individual who seems intent on hunting all three of them down. They also begin to explain the world in which Seth has found himself, and he mightily resists what they tell him. As more and more proof presents itself, Seth is forced to revisit painful moments from his long-ago childhood, and recent events that sent him walking into the ocean intent on dying. If he believes Regine and Tomasz, then much of Seth’s life is a lie. If he rejects what they tell him, then they are the lie, and he’s come to care too much about them to believe that, either. Masterful rather than manipulative, the ambiguity of Patrick Ness’s wholly original and compelling novel gives readers a richly developed array of possibilities but leaves the meaning-making up to them when it comes to divining the situational truth of Seth’s story. But some truths exist at every point along the continuum of possibilities laid out or waiting to be imagined: Meaningful relationships matter, and a life is so much more than can be measured or felt at any single moment in time.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Discussion Questions:

1. How does the author explore the idea expressed by the title, that life is “more than this,” throughout the story? What about the importance of memory and of human connection? What are examples of details and scenes through which you see these ideas developed separately and in relation to one another?

2. Which world do you believe is real? What evidence do you have to support your idea? Do you think it is important to determine which world is “real”?

3. Technology is often seen as a solution to our problems. Is technology a solution to the problems that Seth’s societies face?Icon_HighSchool

Middle School Title for April: One Came Home

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Middle School | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Middle School Title for April: One Came Home)

one came homeOne Came Home by Amy Timberlake. Alfred A. Knopf, 2013.

The largest passenger pigeon nesting on record happened in South Central Wisconsin in 1871. Millions of birds spanned an area of at least 850 square miles. Amy Timberlake’s novel sets a compelling human tale against this fascinating history of the natural world. Thirteen-year-old Georgie lives in a small Wisconsin town in the nesting area. She likes working in the family store and likes being known as the best shot in town. Georgie’s older sister, Agatha, longs to attend college at the university in Madison. Weeks before Agatha ran away with a group of pigeoners—people who follow the pigeons for economic opportunity. Now, the badly decomposed body of a young woman has been found in the woods outside a neighboring town. The dress on the body is Agatha’s. So, too, is the color of the woman’s hair. Georgie refuses to believe Agatha is dead, and flashbacks reveal their sometimes prickly but deeply loving bond. Determined to find Agatha, Georgie runs away on a borrowed mule (she wanted a horse) and reluctantly accepts the company of Billy McCabe, Agatha’s former suitor. Georgie’s fresh, lively, and surprisingly funny voice propels a narrative rich with language and metaphors suited to the setting and the time period. Nothing is predictable, from Georgie’s relationship with Billy McCabe to what the two of them discover in a tale about women and girls and decency and deceit that is full of humor and tenderness. Timberlake provides more information about her research, the nesting, and the tragedy of the now extinct passenger pigeon in an author’s note. (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Discussion Questions:

1. How do the setting and time period of this book (frontier town in Wisconsin, 1871) influence Georgie’s first-person voice? How does Georgie defy traditional expectations for women’s roles in 19th century Wisconsin?

2. Which events in Georgie’s journey change her willingness to kill? Why do you think Georgie had a change of heart about shooting animals?

3. Georgie’s grandfather pays Billy to secretly take Georgie to Dog’s Hollow. Why does he do this, instead of encouraging Georgie to look directly for Agatha?

Books for Middle School Age

Intermediate Title for April: Word with Wings

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Intermediate Title for April: Word with Wings)

words with wingsWords with Wings by Nikki Grimes. Boyds Mills Press, 2013.

1. What are some of the problems Gabriella faces at school? Do you relate to her? How does Gabriella’s teacher help her to solve one of her problems?

2. Why do you think the author used two different fonts in the story? What do you think the two different fonts represent?

3. Read the prologue and the poem on page 22. Why is the main character named Gabriella and how does this name fit her? Think about your own name. How does your name fit you?

Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readers

Primary Titles for April: Take Me Out to the Yakyu

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Primary Titles for April: Take Me Out to the Yakyu)

take me out to the yakhuGRK-2

Take Me Out to the Yakyu by Aaron Meshon. Atheneum, 2013.

1. What are three things that are similar at a baseball game in the United States and Japan? What are three things that are different?

2. What do you like to do with your grandparents?

3. Can you think of something that you do in two or more different places? (for example, eating, reading, jobs) How is it the same? How is it different?

Primary Icon of a White-Tailed Deer

 

Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles for April: My First Day / Lucky Ducklings / Wee Rhymes

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles for April: My First Day / Lucky Ducklings / Wee Rhymes)

my first day

My First Day by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. Illustrated by Steve Jenkins. Houghton Mifflin, 2013.

1. Where is the baby?

2. What is the mother doing?

3. Can you find the baby’s eyes? What other body parts can you find?

 

lucky ducklings

Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore. Illustrated by Nancy Carpenter.  Orchard / Scholastic Inc., 2013.

1. How many baby ducks can you count?

2. Who helped save the ducklings?

3. What would you name a baby duckling?

 

wee rhymesWee Rhymes: Baby’s First Poetry Book by Jane Yolen. Illustrated by Jane Dyer.  A Paula Wiseman Book/Simon & Schuster, 2013.

1. Find a poem that rhymes. Which words in the poem rhyme?

2. Do the poems describe any things you like to do?

3. What’s your favorite poem? Why do you like it?

 

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The Nazi Hunters / I See the Promised Land

March 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in 2014-2015 | High School | March - (Comments Off on The Nazi Hunters / I See the Promised Land)

nazi hunters i see the promised landHS

 

The Nazi Hunters: How a Team of Spies and Survivors Captured the World’s Most Notorious Nazi by Neal Bascomb. Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic Inc., 2013.

I See the Promised Land: A Life of Martin Luther King, Jr. by Arthur Flowers. Illustrated by Manu Chitrakar. Designed by Guglielmo Rossi. Groundwood Books / House of Anansi Press, 2013.

 

Having read one or both of these books…

1. How do the visual elements of the text impact your understanding of the story? What are some of the other choices the authors and illustrators made to emotionally engage readers? How do these elements work together?

2. Cite evidence of people in these books taking action for a cause greater rather than for themselves. What compels them to do this? How do those actions impact us today?

3. What did you learn about the time periods and people involved in these stories that you didn’t know before reading these books?

 

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