Header

Leadership and Politics: October 2016 Intermediate (Gr 3-5)

September 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in October | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) - (Comments Off on Leadership and Politics: October 2016 Intermediate (Gr 3-5))

hiawatha and the peacemaker

Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersHiawatha and the Peacemaker by Robbie Robertson. Illustrated by David Shannon. Abrams, 2015

Hiawatha is consumed by thoughts of revenge after his village is burned and his wife and children killed by Onondaga Chief Tadoaho. Then a leader called the Peacemaker convinces him that unity, not fighting, is the path to take, and asks Hiawatha to help him carry his message of peace among the nations of the Iro-quois. They travel in turn to the Cayuga, Seneca, Oneida, Mohawk, and finally, the Onondaga. On the journey, the Peacemaker meets skepticism and anger with quiet courage and soft-spoken wisdom and his cause is championed by the Clan Mothers. Eventually, Hiawatha’s thoughts of revenge are replaced by forgiveness. He meets his former enemy with understanding, helping Tadoaho defeat the evil that possesses him. Robbie Robertson’s emotionally rich retelling of the origin story of the Iroquois Confederacy he first heard as a child visiting his Mohawk and Cayuga relatives is vivid and compelling. Punctuating the longer narrative is a slightly varied, repeated refrain that gives the story the rhythm of a cumulative tale, this one drawn from history. A historical note explains that Hia-watha and the Peacemaker, a spiritual leader named Deganawida, are thought to have lived in the 14th century. The story is set against strong, beautifully rendered oil illustrations by David Shannon that respect rather than romanticize the characters.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  1. What did you know about Hiawatha before reading the book? What do you know about Hiawatha after reading the book?
  2. How do the illustrations help tell the story? How does the music enhance this story?
  3. What message did you get from this story? Is peace possible without forgiveness?

funny bonesFunny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras by Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams, 2015

José Guadelupa Posada’s etchings of calaveras (skeletons) are a cultural treasure in Mexico. Posada, who was known as Don Lupe, began creating them to illustrate short, funny poems called literary calaveras in the late 19th century. Duncan To-natiuh combines biographical elements about Posada with a history of the calaveras he created, including his artistic mentors and the printing process he used. Tonatiuh discusses the cultural importance of Don Lupe’s calaveras and their connection to El Día de los Muertos. He moves seamlessly through these elements in the narrative while going back and forth visually between his own distinctive art style and reproductions of a number of calaveras created by Don Lupe and an earlier artist named Manuel Manila. Don Lupe’s calavera images included social and political figures, and Tonatiuh ponders their meaning, and also imagines what subjects Don Lupe might choose if he were alive today. A volume that is playful, admiring, and informative is also visually arresting across the two styles of art. A substantial author’s note provides more information on the Day of the Dead, Posada, and calaveras.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  1. How did Posada express his political opinions through art? Why did you decide to do this? Was it effective?
  2. What makes Posada’s original work timeless?
  3. Compare the book’s illustrations with Posada’s. How does this affect your perspective on all the ways skulls are used now?
  4. Day of the Dead and Halloween are celebrated within a day of each other in different cultures. In what ways are they similar? Different? Why are the differences between the holiday’s important?

Save

Save

These Books have Character: October 2016 Primary (K-2)

September 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2016-2017 - (Comments Off on These Books have Character: October 2016 Primary (K-2))

Primary Icon of a White-Tailed Deer

These books work well for learning about character and narrative. We see emotions and actions well as satisfying resolutions from both Penny and Elinor. 

penny and her marblePenny and Her Marble by Kevin Henkes. Greenwillow Books / HarperCollins, 2013

When Penny finds a marble in her neighbor Mrs. Goodwin’s yard she can’t resist taking it home. Later she sees Mrs. Goodwin looking for something outside, and Penny begins to worry. She hides the marble in a drawer. She stays close to Mama all afternoon. She isn’t very hungry at dinner. She dreams about the marble that night. The next day, she puts the marble back, only to discover Mrs. Goodwin had left it out hoping someone like Penny would see it and take it home. “Penny rolled the marble between her fingers. It seemed even more shiny and smooth and blue than before.” Kevin Henkes is so adept at translating the emotional world of young children into entertaining stories that bring a smile and a sigh of satisfaction that it can be easy to forget how much skill goes into them. The latest “Penny” book for advanced beginning readers is as winsome and appealing as the others.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  1. How does the author/illustrator let us know that Penny feels that she has done something wrong by taking the marble?
  2. Why do you think Penny’s mother tells her she can only go as far as Mrs. Goodwin’s?
  3. What does Penny see or dream about that she compares to the marble? How does the author/illustrator convey this information through illustrations or text?

poem in your pocketA Poem in Your Pocket by Margaret McNamara. Illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Schwartz & Wade, 2015

The students in Mr. Tiffin’s class featured in two prior volumes (How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?, The Apple Orchard Riddle) spend the weeks leading up to “Poem-in-Your-Pocket Day” and a school visit from poet Emmy Crane learning about poetry, reading poetry, and writing poems of their own. Overconfident Elinor is sure she’ll write more poems than anyone. But time and again she gets frustrated when the idea in her head doesn’t come out right on paper. She wants perfection. Instead, she’s the only one without a poem to share for Emmy Crane. The poet reassures her, saying, “No poem is perfect.” And when Emmy Crane asks Elinor to talk about her ideas, Elinor’s recitation of all the things she’s seen and felt over recent days is like a poem, of course. Margaret McNamara again hits just the right tone in looking at a classroom learning experience in an engaging, nurturing picture book blithely illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Highly Commended, 2016 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  1. Pre-reading: What are some different kinds (forms) of poems that you know?
  2. What do you think made it difficult for Elinor to write her poem?
  3. How do you think that Emmy Crane helps Elinor?
  4. Which kind of poetry in the book do you like best?

Save

Save

Fun Food Adventures: October 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

September 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | October | 2016-2017 - (Comments Off on Fun Food Adventures: October 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

bear ate your sandiwch

Icon for Babies Toddlers & Preschoolers

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach. Knopf, 2015

“It all started with the bear.” An unknown narrator weaves an impossible story to account for someone’s missing lunch in a picture book pairing a straightforward narrative with beautifully realized illustrations made whimsical by their impossibility. The bear, it seems, fell asleep in the back of a truck full of berries and ended up in a new forest (a city), where he found “climbing spots” (e.g., fire escapes, clothes lines between buildings), “good bark for scratching” (a brick-sided building), and “many interesting smells” (garbage cans). Eventually the bear got hungry, and there was the sandwich, all alone in the midst of leafy green (on a bench in a park). An already delightful story takes an even more waggish turn in its final pages when the identity of the speaker and subject are revealed: a small black dog (somewhat bear-like) pouring out the tall tale to a now lunch-less little girl. The warm, colorful acrylic and pencil illustrations are superb, their realistic accounting of the bear’s adventure will be a source of glee for young readers and listeners, as will the play between narrative and art. ©2015 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Talk: Talk about the differences between the forest and the city.
  • Sing: Bear crosses a bridge to the city. Sing London Bridge.
  • Write: Make sandwiches and cut them into shapes of bears or into the letter B.
  • Play: Can you move like the bear? Can you stretch and sniff, can you climb and scratch? How else does the bear move?
  • Math or Science: Can you make a bridge? With another person? What else can you make a bridge with?

hoot owlHoot Owl, Master of Disguise by Sean Taylor. Illustrated by Jean Jullien. Candlewick Press, 2015

Unconventional Hoot Owl concocts one outrageous costume after another as he attempts to bag his evening meal. But just as his carrot disguise doesn’t fool a rabbit, his ornamental birdbath get-up fails to result in a pigeon dinner. Undaunted, Hoot Owl moves from one lost opportunity to the next, finally nailing an inanimate pepperoni pizza while wearing the white jacket and toque of a waiter, complete with a mustache penciled below his beak. Despite his repeated failures, this bird of prey remains unfailingly confident (“I swoop through the bleak blackness like a wolf in the air”) as he invokes his flamboyant descriptive powers (“The shadowy night stretches away forever, as black as burnt toast.”) Bold black outlines and saturated, flat colors add dramatic flair to Hoot Owl’s nighttime escapades, while his melodramatic prose extends the humor of his plight. After scarfing his pizza, Hoot Owl flies off “into the dark enormousness of the night. “And the world can sleep again.” Honor Book, 2016 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Talk: Talk about all the ways that Hoot Owl moves in the story. Point out the verbs or action words in the book.
  • Sing: Mary Had a Little Lamb
  • Write: Practice the letter O in pudding or shaving cream
  • Play: How can you disguise yourself? Who or what can you become?
  • Math or Science: Talk about what owls eat. What does Hoot Owl eat? What do you eat? How are alike or different?

 

Try these poems about food:

Changes: A Child’s First Poetry Collection: page 32

Lullaby and Kisses Sweet: Food section

Save

Save

Save

Amazing Read Alouds and Highly Discussable Titles for October 2016!

September 16th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Amazing Read Alouds and Highly Discussable Titles for October 2016!)

Looking for a read aloud for your classroom or your library or at home? Looking for suggestions for independent reading, book groups, or reader’s advisory? Try some of the titles below. Find annotations, discussion questions and TeachingBooks.net resources for all of the October 2016 titles in the previous posts below! You can find our complete list of 2016-2017 Read On Wisconsin titles here. If you’re only interested in titles for a specific age group, try our age group icons on the right side of this site.

bear ate your sandiwch

hoot owl

penny and her marble

poem in your pocket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hiawatha and the peacemaker

funny boneshoodoodumplin

Save

Save

Save

Save

Wow! Two New Booktrailers from Jack Young Middle School Students!

June 21st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in October | Book trailer | 2015-2016 | Middle School | January - (Comments Off on Wow! Two New Booktrailers from Jack Young Middle School Students!)

Enjoy and share these student-made promotional videos for Read On Wisconsin titles below. Booktrailers are a great way to share your thoughts with others on books that you’ve read and enjoyed. Maybe you and your kiddos would like to make one for another ROW title. Have fun and let us know so we can post your video, too!

Thanks for the super booktrailers, Jack Young Middle School!

Middle School Books

Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, America’s First Black Paratroopers  (Jack Young Middle School) January 2016 Title

The Screaming Staircase (Jack Young Middle School) October 2015 Title

 

Find Out What Really Happened: October 2015 High School Title

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | 2015-2016 | High School - (Comments Off on Find Out What Really Happened: October 2015 High School Title)

how it went downHow It Went Down by Kekla Magoon. Henry Holt, 2014.Icon_HighSchool

The murder of African American teenager Tariq Johnson and its aftermath is experienced through the voices of witnesses, family members, and his best friend, Tyrell. Two facts are clear: A white man got out of his car and shot Tariq. The police have let that man go free. The rest is conflicting perceptions: Had Tariq just robbed a neighborhood store? (The store owner says no, but his voice is lost in the rush to assume the worst.) Did Tariq have a gun or a Snickers bar in his hand? (Even the two teens from the neighborhood standing close to him disagree.) Meanwhile, as the story hits the news, much of the attention from the media focuses not on the murder but on questions about whether Tariq was a member of the Kings, a neighborhood gang. Tariq and his best friends from childhood all swore they’d never join. Two already have; Junior is even in prison. Tyrell thought Tariq and he were staying strong; now he’s not so sure. But he is sure that Tariq’s death will make it much harder for him to not be drawn or forced into that life. Meanwhile Jennica, who did CPR on Tariq, and whose boyfriend Noodle is in the gang, is desperate to escape her current life. Kekla Magoon’s fearless, tragic, poignant novel examines racism, poverty, violence, and how mightily all of these can trap youth by limiting their options — real and perceived. Not every question is answered outright, but Magoon provides evidence for readers to decide for themselves while adding her voice to the urgent call to acknowledge and address racism and violence.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find teaching guides and ideas and more at Teaching.Books.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Using evidence from the text, explain one character’s perspective of how it went down.
  2. What is Tina’s (the little sister) role in the story? Why does Magoon include non-witness characters like her?
  3. After having read this book, how will this novel effect your view of events in real life similar to those in this novel?

Enjoy Some Haunting Tales: October 2015 Middle School Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | 2015-2016 | Middle School - (Comments Off on Enjoy Some Haunting Tales: October 2015 Middle School Titles)

swallowThe Swallow: A Ghost Story by Charis Cotter. Tundra Books for Middle School AgeBooks, 2014.

Polly often feels lost in the chaos of her big family. But she’s fiery and feisty and doesn’t have trouble speaking her mind. Quiet only child Rose feels invisible. Her parents think about work even when they’re home in the house to which they recently moved, which once belonged to Rose’s grandmother. Polly, who loves ghost stories, wonders if Rose, who can see ghosts, might not be a ghost herself: Rose is pale and wild-looking. Rose’s attempts to convince Polly she’s a real girl recovering from meningitis are temporarily set back when they discover a grave stone with Rose’s name. The girl, the same age as Rose, died years before. Rose realizes this Winifred Rose must be her aunt, and soon encounters the ghost of Winifred at home. Winifred is not only an unhappy ghost, she’s a dangerous one and seems intent on hurting Polly in particular. The two girls are determined to figure out what happened to Winifred and form a deepening friendship as they dig into the past, each finding the companionship and validation they need, each understanding themselves and their families better for knowing one another. Charis Cotter’s satisfyingly scary ghost story, set in 1963 Toronto, is also, and at its most essential, a moving tale of friendship that ends with a revelation.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources for The Swallow at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Fear is a recurring theme in this story. What are the different kinds of fears that the characters experience? How does this affect the pace and tension in the story?
  1. Explain the way that different characters in the story feel invisible.
  1. The swallow is a symbol throughout the book. What does the swallow represent? What is the significance of the swallow? Why do you think the author used the title, The Swallow?

The Screaming Staircase. (Lockwood & Co.: Book One) by screaming staircseJonathan Stroud. Disney / Hyperion, 2013.

In this parallel universe, London residents are at risk from hostile “Visitors”—aka ghosts. Adults lack the ability to see ghosts, so it’s left to young people to put up a fight. Several agencies (think private eye meets Ghostbusters ) serve Britain in this capacity. Lockwood and Company, run by charismatic Anthony Lockwood along with studious George Cubbins and risk-taking Lucy Carlyle, is the only agency without an adult supervisor and as such is viewed as unreliable and rebellious. Lucy narrates her early career with Lockwood and Co. as their clever and brave attempts at ghost removal often end in botched results, lending credence to their detractors’ claims. Eventually they are driven to accept a high-risk, high-reward job in order to repay debts and save their company’s reputation after one of their investigations goes horribly wrong. This smart middle-grade adventure, alternately funny and scary with fallible characters that grow emotionally and intellectually, sets the stage for the continuing escapades of Lockwood and Company.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find lesson plans, a book trailer and more at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. In what time period do you think this story is set? What evidence can you cite?
  1. Secrecy is a theme in this book. How do the secrets affect the plot? How do the secrets affect the development of the characters?
  1. This book’s setting mixes fantasy and realism by imagining that ghosts are real. How do the fantasy aspects of this book affect the realistic parts of the world?

Exploring and Challenging Inequalities: October 2015 Intermediate Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Exploring and Challenging Inequalities: October 2015 Intermediate Titles)

separate is never equalBoth of this month’s books talk about inequality? How do the authors show the inequalities? How do the inequalities affect the main characters’ communities? How are communities different due to inequalities?

Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersfor Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams, 2014.

In 1944, Sylvia Mendez’s Mexican American family had recently moved. She and her siblings were not allowed to go to the public school nearest their farm and were instead told they had to attend the Mexican school, which was farther away and had fewer resources. Sylvia’s father found other families willing to join him in suing the school district, whose only explanation had been, “That is how it is done.” During the trial, Sylvia and her family sat through infuriating testimony in which school district officials blatantly claimed that Mexican children were inferior to white children — in their personal habits, their social abilities, and their intelligence. Author/illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh quotes from the trial as part of this narrative that is grounded in both facts and the emotional experience of young Sylvia. The ample end matter includes a lengthy author’s note with additional information and photographs of Sylvia then and now. A glossary, bibliography, and index round out this distinctively illustrated picture book account of the events surrounding the court case that desegregated California schools seven years before Brown v. Board of Education.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find reader’s theater, various teaching guides, Common Core guide and more for this title at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Why is separate never equal? What are some examples of this from the story?
  2. How do the illustrations help tell the story?
  3. What changes from the start of the story to the end of the story?

The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis. Scholastic Press, 2014.madman of piney woods

In 1901, thirteen-year-old African American Benji, an aspiring newspaper reporter, lives with his parents and younger twin siblings in the Black Canadian town of Buxton. Thirteen-year-old Irish American Red, an aspiring scientist, lives in nearby Chatham with his father and immigrant grandmother. Benji gets work in Chatham as an apprentice at a Black-owned newspaper, where the demanding, good-humored woman owner shapes his talent as a writer (Benji is prone to high drama and alliteration). Meanwhile, patience-tested Red is gaining insight into his unlikable, bitter grandmother, who was scarred by her experiences in the Irish famine and the trauma she faced as a new immigrant. Red thinks it should make her particularly sensitive to racism; instead, she is hateful and bigoted. The boys are drawn together by their good hearts, humor, intelligence, and fascination with differences in how they think about the world. Meanwhile, the man the people Buxton call the Madman in the Woods and the people of Chatham call the South Woods Lion Man is Cooter Bixby, an old friend of Benji’s parents whose experiences in the Civil War left him emotionally damaged. Benji’s encounters transform his understanding of the Madman from frightening figure to kindred spirit–someone else completely at home in nature–while Red’s experience leaves him certain the Lion Man, although eccentric, is good hearted. In a stand-alone, companion novel to Elijah of Buxton, Benji and Red’s friendship, organic and wonderful, represents hope even as it comes into full relief during a tragedy mired in wrong ways of thinking. Christopher Paul Curtis has once again penned a novel of high humor and exquisite grace.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find interviews with Christopher Paul Curtis about writing Madman of Piney Woods, Common Core guide from Scholastic and more at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these prompts:

  1. This story is told from the perspective of two different characters, Benji and Red. How would the story be different if it was told by Grandma O’Toole or the Madman of Piney Woods?
  2. How do the traumatic experiences in Grandma O’Toole’s and the Madman’s lives affect them, their families and their communities? How do these experiences change the choices each makes in life? How are the grandmother and the madman alike? How are the different?
  3. How does the setting of the book help in the development of the characters and the difference in their experiences?

Join the Adventure: October 2015 Primary Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Join the Adventure: October 2015 Primary Titles)

sam and dave dig a holeSam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett. Illustrated by Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerJon Klassen. Candlewick Press, 2014.

Sam and Dave are on a mission: They plan to keep digging until they “find something spectacular.” When digging straight down doesn’t yield results, they turn to the right. Then they split up. They come back together and start digging down again. They take a rest. And all along, their dog — and readers and listeners — understand what they don’t: they keep missing one spectacular thing after another. The straightforward narrative is the foil for the marvelous visual storytelling in a hilarious picture book in which Sam and Dave manage to miss gemstone after gemstone, each one bigger and more spectacular than the one before. The last one is so big the page can’t show it all. When they stop to rest again, dirty and done in by their effort, they are mere inches above a bone. While Sam and Dave sleep the dog starts digging and suddenly all of them are falling … falling … falling … only to land right back where they began … or do they? Brilliantly conceptualized and illustrated, this is truly a book for all ages.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find book trailers, story hour kit and other resources for this title at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading the book: What are some reasons why Sam and Dave would want to dig a hole?
  2. In the pictures, how is the place where Sam and Dave begin their adventure different from where they end up?
  3. The characters say, “We won’t stop digging until we find something spectacular?” What do you consider spectacular? Did they find something spectacular? What about the dog, did it find something spectacular?
  4. What story does the text tell? What story do the pictures tell? How are they different?

Gravity by Jason Chin. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press,gravity 2014.

In an engaging introduction to gravity, a day at the beach unexpectedly turns into a surprising science lesson. In the first few pages, a young cape-clad boy plays with his spaceman and rocket ship on the rocky beach until he discovers a book on gravity. The boy is drawn into the book and soon his toys and other earthly objects are illustrating gravitational principles. The toy spaceman, rocket ship, pail, and shovel, along with a nearby pitcher of lemonade, spin above the earth. Jason Chin explains that without gravity the moon and the sun, just like the toys, would drift away from the earth. “Gravity keeps the earth near the sun, the moon near the earth,” and gravity also keeps objects on the earth. Punctuated text — a few short words per page — provides an accessible definition of gravity and its effects. The accompanying illustrations complement and reinforce the text while the story offers humor and a narrative structure in this simplified, but not diminished, explanation of a complex concept.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find STEM and literacy resources for Jason Chin’s Gravity at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts?

  1. This book is about gravity. What does this book want us to know about gravity?
  2. How do the illustrations help you to understand gravity?
  3. This book combines fiction and non-fiction to relay information and to tell a story. Which parts do you think are fiction? Which parts are nonfiction? Why?

October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | October | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

shh! we have a planShh! We Have a Plan by Chris Haughton. U.S. edition: Candlewick Icon_PreSchoolPress, 2014.

Four wide-eyed hunters are trying to catch a bird in a net. Make that three hunters; the fourth—and smallest–member of their party just wants to be friendly (“Hello, birdie.”). The group’s comical, not-so-stealthy pursuit of the bird features one failed attempt after another, with a pattern emerging as the youngest one greets the bird, the others shush their small companion (“We have a plan”), and then counting to three before they pounce….on nothing as the bird has already flown away. The spare, droll narrative is set against marvelous visual storytelling. The stylized illustrations are in shades of deep blue with black and white, against which the brightly colored red bird stands out. Young readers and listeners will be reciting along and laughing out loud, with the delight heightened by two big surprises as the story draws to a close.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Shh! We Have a Plan at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask children why the character with the plan kept saying “Shh!”
  • Play: Hide a toy and give your child some clues as to where it may be. Now have your child hide a toy and give you the clues.
  • STEM: Take a walk with children and look for animals. How many different type of animals did you see? Talk  about how the animals are similar and how they are different.

Go, Shapes, Go! by Denise Fleming.  Beach Lane, 2014.go shapes go

A small toy mouse on wheels commandingly directs a variety of shapes — squares, circles, ovals, arcs, and rectangles — in different sizes — big, small, thin, tiny — to slide, roll, flip, and fly into the form of a monkey. When the mouse suddenly crashes into the monkey, the shapes reform into a bounding cat. Mouse quickly tames the shapes back into the safer monkey mode. Denise Fleming’s trademark painted-paper collage, uncomplicated text, and comfortable pace make this book an engaging introduction to shapes, sizes, and movement for younger children, as well as to the concepts of parts and wholes, as separate shapes create concrete objects.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Go, Shapes, Go! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Letter knowledge begins with shapes. What shape does the letter A look like? Think about other letters and their corresponding shapes.
  • Write: Draw shapes in sand, shaving cream or pudding
  • Play: Act out the actions from this book – slide, bounce, roll, slither, flip, march, leap, scoot, fly, twirl, hop!
  • STEM: Discuss the different shapes you see in this book and talk about the shapes you see in your daily lives.

i am so braveI Am So Brave by Stephen Krensky. Abrams Appleseed, 2014.

In this slim board book, a young brown-skinned boy tells of overcoming his fears. Each fear is resolved in a way that allows the boy to feel safe, content, and brave. The boy’s obvious pride at overcoming his fears is reflected in the straightforward text and bright graphic-design-style illustrations in primary colors with brown, black, and white. Many of the boy’s fears are common childhood worries — barking dogs, loud traffic noises, bedtime darkness, being separated from Mom and Dad — that all parents and children will easily recognize. The boy’s solutions to his fears offer positive, encouraging responses to the anxiety that many children may feel in new or uncomfortable situations.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for I Am So Brave! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask your child what they can do now that they couldn’t do when they were younger. How does that make you feel to be able to do all of those things now?
  • Sing: “If You’re Happy and You Know It”. Replace happy with different emotion words like grumpy, scared, or excited.
  • Play: Take turns with children acting out different emotions and guessing the emotions.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Our October Titles!

September 18th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | October | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Our October Titles!)

Find out more about these titles! Click on the book cover to read the annotation! Check out resources from TeachingBooks.net for links to teaching guides, videos, author interviews and more for all of the titles below! And, now, check out the posts below for discussion prompts, annotations, and prompts for each title.

Cover for book i am so braveBook cover to go shapes gobook cover of Shh! We Have a Planbook cover for sam and dave dig a holebook cover for gravity

book cover for separate is never equal

book cover for madman of piney woodsswallowscreaming staircsehow it went down

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Book Trailer from Jack Young Middle School Students!

June 10th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in October | Book trailer | Middle School | 2014-2015 - (Comments Off on New Book Trailer from Jack Young Middle School Students!)

Shout out of thanks to JYMS for sending us this book trailer for the ROW 2014 October title, The Thing about Luck by Cynthia Kadohata. Illustrated by Julia Kuo. Atheneum, 2013. Just in time for summer reading suggestions!

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial