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Find out more about this month’s titles by clicking a cover image below!

NOVEMBER
We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman. Clarion, 2016 Read more.
NOVEMBER (1)
The Hole Story of the Doughnut by Pat Miller. Illustrated by Vincent X. Kirsch. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016 Prior to Read more.
NOVEMBER (2)
Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell.  Illustrated by Rafael López. Houghton Read more.
NOVEMBER (1)
Sabotage: The Mission to Destroy Hitler’s Atomic Bomb by Neal Bascomb. Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic, 2016 This riveting Read more.
NOVEMBER (2)
Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys. Philomel, 2016 The sinking of the Nazi passenger ship Wilhelm Gustloff, killing an Read more.
NOVEMBER (1)
The Sound of All Things by Myron Uhlberg. Illustrated by Ted Papoulas. Peachtree, 2016 Both of the young narrator’s parents Read more.
NOVEMBER (2)
Esquivel! Space–Age Sound Artist by Susan Wood. Illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh. Charlesbridge, 2016 Juan Garcia Esquivel was an avant garde Read more.
NOVEMBER (1)
Owl Sees Owl by Laura Godwin. Illustrated by Rob Dunlavey. Schwartz & Wade, 2016 A little owl leaves his mama, Read more.
NOVEMBER (2)
Sleep Tight Farm: A Farm Prepares for Winter by Eugenie Doyle. Illustrated by Becca Stadtlander. Chronicle, 2016 The transformation from Read more.
NOVEMBER (3)
Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie. Illustrated by Yuyi Morales.  Little, Brown, 2016 Thunder Boy Smith Jr. hates his name. Read more.

Find out more about this month’s titles by clicking a cover image below!

OCTOBER (1)
Riding Chance by Christine Kendall. Scholastic Press, 2016 Since his mom died, it’s been hard for Troy, 13, to stay on an Read more.
OCTOBER (2)
Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk. Dutton Books for Young Readers, 2016 Growing up in the shadows cast by two world wars, Read more.
OCTOBER (1)
When We Were Alone by David A. Robertson. Illustrated by Julie Flett. Highwater Press, 2016 A young Cree girl gardening Read more.
OCTOBER (2)
Little Cat’s Luck by Marion Dane Bauer. Illustrated by Jennifer A. Bell. Simon & Schuster, 2016 A small calico cat, Read more.
OCTOBER
Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina. Candlewick Press, 2016 Nora López is finishing high school uncertain about the future. Encouraged Read more.
OCTOBER (1)
In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall. Amulet/Abrams, 2015 Jimmy McLean is self-conscious about his blue eyes, fair Read more.
OCTOBER (2)
I Am Not a Number by Jenny Kay Dupuis and Kathy Kacer. Illustrated by Gillian Newland. Second Story Press, 2016 Read more.
OCTOBER (1)
My Heart Fills with Happiness by Monique Gray Smith.  Illustrated by Julie Flett. Orca, 2016 “My heart fills with happiness Read more.
OCTOBER (2)
Good Night, Bat! Good Morning, Squirrel! by Paul Meisel. Boyds Mills Press / Highlights, 2016 When Bat loses his home, Read more.

Browse through all of the titles for September below and click on a cover image below to find out more about the book, including annotation, discussion questions, and link to TeachingBook.net curated resources.

SEPTEMBER
It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas. Clarion, 2016 Zomorod and her parents are in the United States for her Read more.
SEPTEMBER (1)
School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex. Illustrated by Christian Robinson. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Book Press, Read more.
SEPTEMBER (2)
Excellent Ed by Stacy McAnulty. Illustrated by Julia Sarcone-Roach. Alfred A. Knopf, 2016 “All of the Ellis children were allowed Read more.
SEPTEMBER
March: The Trilogy by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. Illustrated by Nate Powell. Top Shelf, 2013-2016 March: Book Three The Read more.
SEPTEMBER (1)
Juana & Lucas by Juana Medina. Candlewick Press, 2016 Juana is a little girl living in Bogotá, Colombia. Lucas is Read more.
SEPTEMBER (2)
Book Uncle and Me by Uma Krishnaswami. Illustrated by Julianna Swaney. Groundwood, 2016 Nine-year-old Yasmin visits Book Uncle’s Lending Library, Read more.
SEPTEMBER (1)
We Sang You Home by Richard Van Camp. Illustrated by Julie Flett. Orca, 2016 “ We sang you from a Read more.
SEPTEMBER (2)
Rudas: Niño’s Horrendous Hermanitas by Yuyi Morales. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016 Niño’s back and this Read more.

Bookmarks! An easier, quicker way to share ROW titles with others!

This year we are creating digital bookmarks that you can download, print and distribute or you can use them on screens in your library or school.

Bookmarks for September titles in each age level group are shown above. Click on the link below for printable pdfs  (each pdf includes a back side listing titles for the month at all levels). Look for October through May bookmarks throughout the year, here and on our social media accounts.

The bookmarks contains all of the ROW September 2017 titles for all age level groups in one handy place. Print and use as a bookmark or pin or tweet the bookmark to share our September titles with others. Again, check back for October to May bookmarks!

Contact us if you need further help with ROW bookmarks!

Sep_Bookmark_Robin.pdf

September_Bookmark_Deer

Sep_Bookmark_Muskie.pdf

September_Boomark_Maple

September_Bookmark_Badger

MAY (2)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | May - (Comments Off on MAY (2))

Narwhal: Unicorn of the Sea: Unicorn of the Sea. (A Narwhal and Jelly Book) by Ben Clanton. Tundra Books, 2016

When Narwhal and Jellyfish first meet, neither can believe the other is real. “I can’t believe this! The thing I’m imagining is imagining that it is imagining me,” observes a somewhat disgruntled Jelly. Even once Jelly is convinced Narwhal is real, and agrees that Narwhal’s horn is awesome, Narwhal identifies Jelly as an imaginary friend. “We’re friends?” Jelly asks hopefully. “Sure thing!” They seal the deal by eating waffles (“Nom Nom Nom”). That opening chapter in this droll graphic novel is followed by two more stories, “Narwhal’s Pod of Awesomeness” and “Narwhal and the Best Book Ever.” Two brief interludes include “Really Fun Facts” about narwhals and jellyfish (e.g., a narwhal’s horn- like tooth can grow to up to 3 feet; a group of jellyfish is called a smack), and the “Narwhal Song” praising waffles and parties. Open-hearted Narwhal and dubious Jelly are a dynamite friendship duo. The simple, engaging line drawings are done with a limited, somewhat muted palette dominated by watery blue. © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What are some ways Narwhal’s imagination makes the story funny?
  2. What information about Narwhals do you find the most interesting in this book?
  3. At first, Jelly did not understand Narwhal’s book. At the end, he wanted to borrow it. What changed?
  4. If you had a blank book like Narwhal, what story would you tell?

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MAY (1)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | May - (Comments Off on MAY (1))

Whoosh! Lonnie Johnson’s Super–Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton. Illustrated by Don Tate. Charlesbridge, 2016

Lonnie Johnson once took an aptitude test that indicated he wouldn’t make a good scientist. Luckily he ignored it. As a teen he led his team to a science fair victory, and as an adult he worked for NASA. But perhaps the biggest impact his work has had on today’s children is as inventor of the Super Soaker. It was an accidental invention that occurred when he was working on a new cooling system for refrigerators and air conditioners. This picture-book biography shows Lonnie as an inquisitive, tinkering child who faced some obstacles growing up in Mobile, Alabama, in the 1960s. As Barton has done in previous books, he does not shy away from racial history, as he discusses some of the obstacles Lonnie has faced as an African American scientist. Tate’s appealing illustrations show Lonnie’s life-long determination as well as the technical details of his inventions. They include an amusing fold-out page that shows the blast of water from his prototype Super Soaker as part of a successful demonstration aimed at a board room full of toy company executives. (Ages 6–11)  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How did Lonnie overcome the challenges in his life?
  2. Have you ever invented something or do you have an idea for an invention?
  3. If you had the opportunity to meet Lonnie Johnson, what questions would you ask him?

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APRIL (2)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | April - (Comments Off on APRIL (2))

Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford. Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie. little bee, 2016

A potent narrative begins, “Mondays, there were hogs to slop, / mules to train, and logs to chop. / Slavery was no ways fair. / Six more days to Congo Square.” Congo Square, the essential Foreword explains, was a legal gathering spot for enslaved and free Blacks in New Orleans. The first 14 couplets count down the days to Congo Square, documenting the work of enslaved men and women as they labored in fields and in houses, in despair and in defiance, Monday through Saturday. “The dreaded lash / too much to bear …. Run away, run away. Some slaves dared.” The remaining 11 couplets mark the transition to Sunday, and the gathering in Congo Square, spinning out details of music and dancing, chanting and singing, lifting spirits and hearts. The words are set against spare, expressive paintings in which stylized, elongated figures with little or no facial details carry out the heavy work of Monday through Saturday. The constrained figures break free once Sunday comes, moving with fluid joy and abandon. A glossary and an author’s note providing more historical context conclude this rich and stirring work. ©2017 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How do the illustrations help the reader understand the text?
  2. Using the text and illustrations, compare what the slaves are doing on Sunday versus the rest of the week?
  3. How does Congo Square represent freedom? What makes Congo Square unique?

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APRIL (1)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | April - (Comments Off on APRIL (1))

Daniel Finds a Poem by Micha Archer. Nancy Paulsen Books / Penguin, 2016

Each day leading up to “Poetry in the Park,” Daniel asks a different animal what poetry is. And each animal has an answer. Poetry is “when morning dew glistens,” says Spider. It’s “when crisp leaves crunch,” says Squirrel. It’s “a cool place to dive into,” says Frog. By week’s end, when the event arrives, Daniel turns the many things he’s heard into a poem that reveals how poetry is senses, and observation, and language, and feeling. “On the way home, Daniel stops to watch the sunset sky reflecting in the pond. ‘That looks like poetry to me.’” A quiet, purposeful story featuring brown-skinned Daniel features lovely, striking collage illustrations and invites children to notice the poetry in the small moments of their lives. Highly Commended, 2017 Charlotte Zolotow Award ©2017 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How does Daniel show that he is curious?
  2. What did you learn about poetry from Daniel’s experiences at the park?
  3. What looks like poetry to you?

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MARCH (2)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (2))

The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito. Illustrated by Julia Kuo. Little, Brown, 2016

On the busy streets of Tokyo, Yoshio asks a koto player her favorite sound. She replies that the most beautiful sound to her is ma, the sound of silence. Yoshio tries to hear the sound of silence, but can’t find it. Noise seems to be everywhere: kids at school, traffic on the street, his family’s chopsticks and chewing during dinner. It’s not until Yoshi is engrossed in reading a book in an empty classroom that he realizes he’s hearing a moment of ma. “It had been there between the thumps of his boots when he ran; when the wind stopped for just a moment in the bamboo grove; at the end of his family’s meal, when everyone was happy and full; after the water finished draining from his bath; before the koto’s player music began—and hovering in the air, right after it ended. It was between and underneath every sound.” A picture book set in Tokyo is illustrated with detailed pen and digitally colored scenes that are both expansive and intimate, much like the story is full of both activity and quiet. An Afterword gives additional information about the Japanese concept of ma. Highly Commended, 2017 Charlotte Zolotow Award ©2016 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What is your favorite sound and why?
  2. What words does the author use to describe the sounds in the city?
  3. Have you ever heard silence like Yoshio?
  4. Throughout the story, what is the connection between the setting and Yoshio?
  5. In what ways is Yoshio’s home similar and/or different from your home?

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MARCH (1)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (1))

When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano. Illustrated by Julie Morstad. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016

“just like a tiny, blue hello / a crocus blooming / in the snow” (march 22). A collection of poems full of lovely, often playful observations and turns of phrase moves through the seasons. In summer “you can taste the sunshine … ” (june 15). In autumn, “because they know / they cannot stay / they fade and fall / then blow away / because they know / they cannot stay / they leave / they leave / they leave” (october 15). Finally, there is winter, when “i would not mind, at all / to fall / if i could fall / like snowflakes …” (january 5). The poems are titled with a date, and are set in every month across the year. With the exception of pumpkin-carving on October 31 there are no references to either religious or secular observances, another refreshing aspect of a book featuring perfectly paired illustrations. The art features diverse children in scenes with a soft, cozy, almost nostalgic feel. (Ages 4–8).  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What is your favorite poem in the story? How does it make you feel?
  2. What is your favorite season? If you were writing a poem about your favorite season, what would you include?
  3. Choose a poem and talk about what you see in your mind when hearing it. Ask others what they see in their mind when they hear your poem.

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FEBRUARY (2)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | February - (Comments Off on FEBRUARY (2))

A Bike Like Sergio’s by Maribeth Boelts. Illustrated by Noah Z. Jones. Candlewick Press, 2016

Everybody has a bike but Ruben. He longs for one like his friend Sergio’s, but he knows his family can’t afford any kind of bicycle. So when Ruben sees a neighbor in the grocery store drop a hundred-dollar bill from her purse, he snatches it up and pockets it. It’s enough to buy him a bike like Sergio’s. Will he do it? Ruben thinks through this ethical dilemma over the next day or so and ultimately decides to do the right thing. “What you did wasn’t easy,” his dad tells him later, “but it was right.” Both text and pictures show a family living on the economic edge, facing realistic challenges in their day-to-day lives. Highly Commended, 2017 Charlotte Zolotow Award ©2017 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How does the author let the reader know Ruben’s family does not have a lot of money?
  2. How do Ruben’s feelings change throughout the story? How does Ruben show empathy?
  3. What do you think Ruben would have done if he had not seen the lady again at the grocery store?
  4. What do would you do if you found something valuable like Ruben, but you did not know who had lost it?

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FEBRUARY (1)

May 9th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2017-2018 Primary | February - (Comments Off on FEBRUARY (1))

The Quickest Kid in Clarksville by Pat Zietlow Miller.  Illustrated by Frank Morrison. Chronicle, 2016

Alta prides herself on being the fastest runner in Clarksville, Tennessee, hometown of Olympic star Wilma Rudolph. But Charmaine, of the new-shoes-just-like-Wilma’s, is fast, too. She may be even faster than Alta, although it’s hard to say: Alta is sure Charmaine tripped her when she won the race between them. Alta ended up with a hole in her sneaker. “Oh, baby girl,” says Mama. “Those shoes have to last.” On the day of a parade for Wilma Rudolph, Alta and her friends Dee-Dee and Little Mo make a huge banner, but getting the banner all the way to the parade isn’t easy, and time is running out. Then Charmaine shows up and suggests they take turns carrying it–a relay, just like Wilma ran for one of her medals. “Three people ran it with her, you know,” Charmaine says. “I hate to admit it, but she’s right.” A spirited story set in 1960 ends with an author’s note featuring a photograph of Wilma Rudolph at the real parade held in her honor in Clarksville. The energetic illustrations are full of movement and feeling. ©2016 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. If you were going to try out for the Olympics, what event would you choose?
  2. How and why does the relationship between Alta and the new girl change?
  3. How do the girls see Wilma Rudolph as a role model? How does she inspire them?
  4. “Shoes don’t matter. Not as long as we’ve got our feet.” — Do you agree or disagree with this quote?
  5. What role does the setting play in the story?

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