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High School December 2018 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | December | High School - (Comments Off on High School December 2018 (1))

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Anderson, M. T.
Landscape with Invisible Hand. Candlewick Press, 2017. 149  pages (978–0–7636–8789–2)

Age 13 and older

When the vuvv first arrived to conquer Earth they promised great technology, cures for all disease, and freedom from work. The truth, as teenage Adam knows, looks very different. Great technology and medical care are only for those who can afford it. Work is hard to come by thanks to all that tech, while food and housing still cost money. Adam’s attraction to Chloe was the impetus to earn money for both their families by live streaming their romance to the vuvv, who think Hollywood romances of the 40s and 50s, when they first tapped into human transmissions, are the ways all humans interact. Adam and Chloe’s dates were a hit and the money started rolling in. Now they’ve fallen out of love and seethe beneath their live-streamed smiles. Meanwhile, Adam longs to be a serious artist. When some of his paintings garner positive attention and he’s invited to enter a prestigious vuvv contest, he faces a dilemma: enter a piece that expresses the idealized human world they imagine, or a piece that reflects the truth of his grimmer outlook and experience. The decision has potential life or death implications when Adam’s chronic illness, an intestinal condition that impacts his daily life and for which his family cannot afford vuvv treatment, worsens. A slim volume packed full of big ideas that resonate with the world today, delivered with humor and poignancy. Each vignette-like chapter is named for one of Adam’s paintings. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School November 2018

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | November | High School - (Comments Off on High School November 2018)

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Slater, Dashka. The 57 Bus. Farrar Straus Giroux, 2017. 305 pages (978–0–374–30323–5)

Age 12 and older

Despite recently losing a friend to gun violence, African American Richard is focused on improving his grades and graduating from his Oakland high school. Sasha, who attends private school, is agender and brilliant, the type of person who invents languages for fun. On November 4, 2013, as Richard and Sasha ride the bus home from their respective schools, Richard holds a lighter to Sasha’s skirt, which erupts into flames. This event sets in motion a long, painful process of court appearances for Richard, and healing for both. The two teens are treated with respect and empathy in this nonfiction account that begins with an exploration of their backgrounds, including Sasha’s gradual understanding that they don’t identify as either male or female, and continues through Sasha’s recovery and Richard’s sentencing. Accessible descriptions of aspects of the U.S. and California justice systems—the practice of restorative justice and California’s Proposition 21, which allows juvenile offenders to be charged as adults—in addition to information about Richard’s personality and adolescent brains and behavior, suggest that, as Richard’s friend attests, the crime “was like a funny prank-joke turns to something that ends your whole life.” Although a grim event begins this narrative, the humanity of both teens and their families is palpable throughout. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School October 2018

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | October | High School - (Comments Off on High School October 2018)

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Sáenz, Benjamin Alire.
The Inexplicable Logic of My Life. Clarion, 2017. 445 pages (978–0–544–58650–5)

Age 13 and older

High school senior Sal(vador) Silva was 3 when his mom died. Adopted by Vicente, his mom’s best friend, the love between father and son is palpable. Sal’s best friend, Sam(antha) Diaz, has a single mom so wrapped up in her own life that Sam feels like an afterthought. Sal’s friend Fito works two jobs to save money for college and to escape his family of addicts. Sal knows he has a good life. So why is he suddenly full of rage? He lashes out even before he learns that Mima, his grandmother, is dying. Mima means the world to Sal, his dad, and their extended Mexican American family, in which it’s never mattered that Sal is white. Sal worries his instinct to respond with his fists—to a whispered slur about his dad, who is gay, or to a boy who treats Sam badly—is a trait from the birth father he’s never known or cared to find out about. Several explosive events disrupt the shifting currents of daily life in a deeply felt story graced with moments of humor. Exquisitely realized and genuine, it’s about living and struggling and loss and regret. It’s about changing relationships and growing up and friendship. It’s about the power of language. Above all, it’s about the expansiveness of the words “love” and “family.” ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School September 2018

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | September | High School - (Comments Off on High School September 2018)

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Watson, Renée.
Piecing Me Together. Bloomsbury, 2017. 264 pages (978–1–68119–105–8)

Age 13 and older

Jade misses going to school with neighborhood friends but the private school she attends on scholarship offers an international volunteer opportunity. This year she hopes to be chosen. In the meantime, Jade’s school counselor encourages her to participate in a community-based mentoring program for African American girls. Jade is paired with Maxine, an African American alum of her school. Meanwhile Jade’s classmate Sam—whom she gets to know because they both ride the bus, a rarity—has never stepped foot in Jade’s neighborhood. It all has Jade thinking about how people perceive her, and her community. Then she isn’t chosen for the volunteer trip to Costa Rica, despite tutoring fellow students in Spanish. The reason? Jade already participates in the mentoring program and her teacher feels other students deserve opportunities, too. Jade’s frustration is further fueled by the assault of a young Black woman by police in a nearby community. For Jade, the beating is too close, too personal, intensifying her sense of disquiet and disconnect with her school community, including Sam. Why, she finally challenges her teacher, her counselor, her mentor, does everyone assume because she is poor and Black that she needs help and “opportunities” but has nothing to offer, something to give? This vivid, poignant novel features singular characters; complex, authentic relationships; and a young woman voicing a critical truth. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Middle School Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Middle School | Middle School | Summer - (Comments Off on Middle School Summer 2019 (3))

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Thimmesh, Catherine. Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on th Moon. 
Houghton Mifflin, 2006. 80 pages (0-618-50757-4)

Ages 10-15

A vast army of workers comprised the team that sent astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the moon in 1969. The accomplishments of the individuals behind the scenes, from engineers to space suit seamstresses, were integral components in the Apollo 11 mission, yet their stories are rarely told. Author Catherine Thimmesh describes the vital and varied work of many, while outlining the chronology of the space mission from conception through splash-down. Despite knowing the outcome of these historic events, readers will be on the edge of their seats as potential disasters loom and are conquered by the team, sometimes with mere seconds to spare. Powerful photographs and frequent quotes from the many individuals involved add to the depth of this fascinating work. (MVL) ©2006 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

 

Middle School Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Middle School | Middle School | Summer - (Comments Off on Middle School Summer 2019 (2))

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Moore, David Barclay.
The Stars Beneath Our Feet. Alfred A. Knopf, 2017.  294 pages (978–1–5247–0124–6)

Ages 9-13

On the edge of young adulthood, Lolly has the support of his hardworking, no nonsense mom and her girlfriend; his dad, who isn’t a daily presence in his life but whose love is never in doubt; staff at the community center; and his best friend, Vega. He’s also keenly aware that the freedom with which he moved through Harlem when he was young has changed now that he’s 12; now that he’s eyed by various crews of older boys and young men as being either with them or against them. The threat feels all the more real since his big brother Jermaine was recently shot and killed, and Lolly’s grief is complicated by the fact his brother, so often his protector, was mad at him for refusing to get involved in Jermaine’s dubious business. But Lolly’s sense of himself and the world and possibilities begins expanding after receiving an architecture book as a gift. Inspired to begin constructing an elaborate city out of Lego bricks, his efforts lead to a surprising new friendship with Rose, a girl most kids shun, who is navigating struggles of her own, and to exploring the real places pictured in the book. Lolly and his family, friends, and neighbors are vivid and alive in a story featuring exceptional characterizations and dialogue. The complexities of family and friendships come into full relief in a story celebrating the power of creativity and community in a child’s life. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Middle School Summer 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Middle School | Middle School | Summer - (Comments Off on Middle School Summer 2019 (1))

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Anderson, Jodi Lynn.
Midnight at the Electric. HarperTeen, 2017. 257  pages (978–0–06–239354–8)

Age 12 and older

In 2065, Adri moves in with her newly discovered cousin, Lily, while she trains for her future life as a settler on Mars. Loner Adri worries living with elderly, open-hearted Lily will be hard, but Lily is respectful of Adri’s privacy and Galapagos, a giant tortoise on Lily’s Kansas farm, is a peaceful companion. In 1934 Catherine lives with her mother, little sister, and a tortoise named Galapagos on their Kansas farm, where the dust storms ravaging the Plains threaten her little sister’s health. Learning the boy she loves also loves her is bittersweet when Catherine, debating something drastic to save her sister, discovers a secret about the past that raises huge questions about her family. In 1919, Lenore lives in England, mourning the loss of a beloved brother in the Great War. Lenore wants to visit her best friend, Beth, in America. In the meantime, she forges a friendship with James, a disfigured young man who tests her understanding of compassion and acceptance while spinning impossible stories about his life. For Adri, who’s never relied on anyone but herself and is struggling to connect with others on her team, the old letters and journals in Lily’s house leading her to Catherine’s and Lenore’s stories hold surprising fascination. Family, friendship, and the family that friendship can be are the gifts Catherine, Lenore, and especially Lily give Adri as she prepares for her journey in this singular novel graced by complex, poignant characters and relationships. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Middle School May 2019

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Middle School | Middle School | May - (Comments Off on Middle School May 2019)

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Cartaya, Pablo.
The Epic Fail of Arturo Zamora. Viking, 2017. 236 pages (978–1–101–99723–9)

Ages 10-13

Arturo lives in an apartment complex in Miami along with most of the rest of his extended, closeknit, sometimes chaotic Cuban American family. At the center of their lives are Abuela and La Cocina de la Isla, the restaurant she began with Arturo’s late grandfather. With Abuela’s health in question, no one wants to tell her about the threat to the proposed expansion of the restaurant into the empty lot next door: a new, buffoonish developer in town has plans for an upscale high-rise. At the heart of this lively story are important questions: How do communities shape and value individuals? How do individuals shape communities? How do differing ideas of what constitutes “progress,” including gentrification, impact community, and the family that community can be? They are explored in a blithe narrative featuring a slightly lovesick middle schooler (Arturo is trying to figure out if visiting Carmen likes him the same way he likes her) trying to help his family convince the city council to vote in favor of their restaurant’s proposal. Arturo finds inspiration for both his ideals and love in the poetry of Jose Martí, the Cuban poet and activist whom, he learns, his late grandfather loved (and Carmen does, too). ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

We’ve just finalized the Read On Wisconsin reading lists for 2018-2019.  Check out the selections below!  Watch for additional information about the titles in the coming month.
Complete list of 2018-2019 ROW books (pdf).

Icon for Babies Toddlers & PreschoolersBabies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

(pdf of BTP list)

 

September:

Baby’s First Words
by Stella Backstone and Sunny Scribbens. Illustrated by Christiane Engel. Barefoot Books, 2017. 20 pages (978-1-78285-321-3)
My Autumn Book by Wong Herbert Yee. Christy Ottaviano Books / Henry Holt, 2015 32 pages. (978–0–8050–9922–5)

October:

Herbert’s First Halloween by Cynthia Rylant. Illustrated by Steven Henry. Chronicle, 2017. 28 pages (978-1-4521-2533-6)

I Want To Be in a Scary Story by Sean Taylor. Illustrated by Jean Jullien. Candlewick Press, 2017. 48 pages (978-0-7636-8953-7)

November:

Hooray for Birds! by Lucy Cousins. U.S. edition: Candlewick Press, 2017. 32 pages (978-0-7636-9265-0)
Owl Bat Bat Owl by Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick. U.S. edition: Candlewick Press, 2017. 32 pages (978-0-7636-9161-5)

December:

Baby Goes to Market by Atinuke. Illustrated by Angela Brooksbank. Candlewick Press, 2017. 32 pages (978-0-7636-9570-5)
Blocks by Irene Dickson. Nosy Crow / Candlewick Press, 2016. 24 pages (978–0–7636–8656–7)

 

(more…)

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