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Middle School March 2019

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Middle School | Middle School | March - (Comments Off on Middle School March 2019)

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Pérez, Celia C.
The First Rule of Punk. Viking, 2017. 310 pages (978–0–425–29040–8)

Ages 9-12

Malú and her mom have moved from Gainsville to Chicago for her mom’s two- year visiting professorship. Mixed-race (Mexican/white) Malú, whose parents are amicably divorced, is unhappy about leaving her dad, who nurtured her interest in punk. She also feels like her mom, whom she calls SuperMexican, wants her to be a perfect señorita, which couldn’t be further from Malú’s understanding of herself (or, it turns out, the truth). Expressing her punk identity with heavy make-up the first day at José Guadalupe Posada Middle School doesn’t just raise her mom’s eyebrows, however: Malú’s in violation of school rules. The mom of Malú’s new friend, Joe, introduces Malú to Mexican American punk musicians—something Malú didn’t know existed— and other Mexican singers. Malú recruits Joe and two other kids to form a punk band and try out for the school talent show. When the principal rejects their act, Malú and her bandmates organize an alternate talent show in the spirt of their school’s namesake while reworking a classic Mexican song into a punk performance that brings together the parts of Malú’s identity she once thought were disparate. Malú’s zines exploring aspects of her personal history and culture add a rich visual dimension to a spirited, engaging story about a creative, irrepressible girl navigating uncertainties and making new connections and discoveries. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Intermediate March 2019

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | March - (Comments Off on Intermediate March 2019)

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Kelly, Erin Entrada. Hello, Universe. Greenwillow, 2017. 313 pages (978–0–06–241415–1)

Ages 8-12

Shy Virgil feels like a failure for not finding the courage to say hello to Valencia before the end of the school year. But his friend Kaori, who believes in fate and fortunes and is an aspiring astrologer, is sure it’s fated for Virgil and Valencia to be friends, so as summer starts she’s offering him counsel. On his way to Kaori’s one day, Virgil encounters bullying Chet in the woods. True to form, Chet steals Virgil’s backpack. Then he drops it down an old well and takes off. Inside the backpack, nestled in fleece, is Virgil’s beloved guinea pig. Chet was unaware, but would it have mattered? Virgil attempts a rescue on his own but gets stuck at the bottom of the well. Meanwhile, Valencia is out exploring the woods nearby, on her way to her own appointment with Kaori, but she can’t hear Virgil calling out from the bottom of the well because she is deaf. The strands of fate and friendship intertwine in surprising ways in this riveting story alternating among the perspectives of Virgil, Kaori, Valencia (all wonderfully developed, singular characters), and Chet. Filipino American Virgil, who feels overshadowed even in his own boisterous family, finds that his grandmother’s (Lola) stories help sustain him in the well, and maybe, just maybe, their magic extends to real life. If friendship is magic, they surely do.  ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Primary March 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Primary | Primary (Grades K-2) | March - (Comments Off on Primary March 2019 (2))

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Pinkney, Jerry.
The Three Billy Goats Gruff. Little, Brown, 2017. 32 pages (978–0–316–34157–8)

Ages 3-6

This mostly faithful retelling of the traditional tale stars the familiar trio of goats crossing a bridge guarded by a terrible troll to reach a lush pasture. After the smallest and mid-size goats successfully outwit the troll and cross the bridge, the largest billy goat Gruff butts the creature into the river. There, in a moment of satisfying reciprocity, the troll narrowly escapes a close encounter with a huge and hungry fish. Jerry Pinkney’s trademark pencil and watercolor illustrations masterfully capture his subjects, from charming goats to a deliciously menacing troll. Observant readers who follow the story into the endpapers will see hints of a new community where goats and troll live cooperatively. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Primary March 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Primary | Primary (Grades K-2) | March - (Comments Off on Primary March 2019 (1))

book coverStewart, Melissa. Can an Aardvark Bark? Illustrated by Steve Jenkins. Beach Lane, 2017. 32 pages (978–1–4814–5852–8)

Ages 5-9

A primary narrative strings together questions and answers about the sounds animals do and don’t make (“Can an aardvark bark? No, but it can grunt … Can a seal squeal? No, but it can bark … Can a wild boar roar? No, but it can squeal.”). Each question-and-answer pair is followed by a page spread that provides examples of other animals that make the same sound. (e.g, “Lots of other animals grunt too.”) For all of the animals named—and shown in Steve Jenkins’s striking collage portraits set against white pages—there is a brief description relating to the sound it makes: how it makes that sound, or under what circumstances. (“A European hedgehog snorts when it’s angry and purrs when it’s happy. When the prickly critter senses danger, it squeals and rolls up in a tight ball.”) There is playfulness in the rhymes and the occasional disruption of the patterned primary text, while the brief information about each animal is also offered in the spirit of both fact-finding and fun. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

BTP March 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | March - (Comments Off on BTP March 2019 (2))

Fleming, Candace. Go Sleep in Your Own Bed! Illustrated by Lori Nichols. Schwartz & Wade, 2017. 32 pages (978–0–375–86648–7)

Ages 2-4

A pleasingly circular barnyard story in which each animal, asleep in the wrong bed, is awakened in turn by the animal who belongs there with the repeated command: “Go sleep in your own bed!” But each one finds an interloper, who is given the same command. In the end the last creature, a cat, is picked up from his spot on the porch and carried inside by a little girl who happily shares her bed with him. With the strong pattern and repetition, as well as the funny species-specific interjections and onomatopoeia, this will make a terrific read-aloud for young children. The amusing acrylic illustrations give added personalities to each of the animals.  ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

BTP March 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | March - (Comments Off on BTP March 2019 (1))

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Hest, Amy. Buster and the Baby. Illustrated by Polly Dunbar. Candlewick Press, 2017. 32 pages (978–0–7636–8787–8)

Ages 2-4

Buster is a scruffy little white dog who delights in hiding from an active toddler. Thump, thump, thump goes his heart as he waits to be found under the table, behind an arm chair, behind a large teddy bear. Each time baby is equal to the task, finding Buster with squealing and whirling as the two play throughout the day. Hest’s patterned text and Dunbar’s lively illustrations capture the anticipation and excitement of waiting to be found in the classic game of hide-and-seek, one that has a playful reversal and cozy conclusion as the day draws to a close.  ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School March 2019

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | High School | March - (Comments Off on High School March 2019)

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Mathieu, Jennifer. Moxie. Roaring Brook Press, 2017. 330 pages (978–1–62672–635–2)

Age 13 and older

Vivvy loves the Riot Grrrl bands and zines of her mother’s youth, but unlike her mom at 16, Vivvy is not a wave-maker or rule-breaker in her small east Texas town, until anger at the rampant sexism at her school spurs her to action. Vivvy creates an anonymous zine, Moxie, calling out the sexism—some of it verbal, some of it physical, some of it psychological, all of it an assault. New student Lucy, an avowed feminist, loves Moxie, while Vivvy’s best friend Claudia finds the word “feminist” too much and the Moxie calls to action useless. New boy Seth, on whom Vivvy has a crush, sees Vivvy placing copies of Moxie in the bathrooms, but he keeps her secret and romance blossoms. Moxie begins to illuminate and then bridge divides of race and class as many different girls begin to embrace the anonymous zine and the Moxie movement slowly grows. The sexism at Vivvy’s school—insidious and infuriating—is both believable in the context of this story and also symbolic of the sexism in our society as a whole: It is systemic in scope; takes myriad forms; is too rarely acknowledged or challenged; has an impact that is achingly personal; those who fight back face repercussions; and every additional voice adds power to the call for change. Mathieu’s narrative is fierce and inspiring, while her nuanced characters and the complexity of their relationships ground the story.  ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find out more about this month’s titles by clicking a cover image below!

Bookmarks.

MARCH
The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge. Amulet / Abrams, 2016 When 14-year-old Faith’s scientist father is accused of trying to Read more.
MARCH (1)
When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano. Illustrated by Julie Morstad. A Neal Porter Book / Read more.
MARCH (2)
The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito. Illustrated by Julia Kuo. Little, Brown, 2016 On the busy streets of Tokyo, Read more.
MARCH
The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry. Viking, 2016 In 13th-century western Europe, the Inquisition is control through terror, as Read more.
MARCH (1)
When the Sea Turned to Silver by Grace Lin. Little, Brown, 2016 A historical fantasy weaves retellings of traditional Chinese Read more.
MARCH (2)
Giant Squid by Candace Fleming. Illustrated by Eric Rohmann. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016 Giant squids Read more.
MARCH (1)
Babies Don’t Walk, They Ride! Kathy Henderson. Illustrated by Lauren Tobia. U.S. edition: Templar Books / Candlewick Press, 2016 Babies Read more.
MARCH (2)
Rescue Squad No. 9 by Mike Austin. Random House, 2016 “Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!” The distress call launches Rescue Squad No. Read more.
MARCH (3)
The Airport Book by Lisa Brown. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016 Endpapers showing a block of Read more.

MARCH (3)

May 16th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2017-2018 | 2017-2018 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (3))

The Airport Book by Lisa Brown. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016

Endpapers showing a block of city apartments in the rain with a small boy and even smaller girl in two windows begin this account of their family’s airplane trip. The little girl packs her beloved stuffed animal monkey herself, resulting in a not-quite-securely-fastened suitcase. The family arrives at the airport, checks in, goes through security, and gets settled on the plane. The flight includes safety instructions, snacking, and cloud-watching. After landing they must wait for their luggage before going outside and into the arms of the children’s grandparents. Engagingly detailed page spreads offer intriguing and whimsical elements, from the family’s interactions, to fellow travelers, some of who can be followed or found again at journey’s end, to airport signs and scenes. Meanwhile, monkey’s parallel journey in the suitcase includes a surprising and sweet encounter with a live dog in the cargo hold. (Horizontally split pages show the progress of the luggage—and monkey—at the bottom.) Speech bubble dialogue adds additional humor to an inviting and informative primary narrative (“Inside the airport you stand in lines. You stand in lines to get your ticket. You stand in lines to check your bags. There are lines for the restrooms. There are lines to go through security.”) Closing endpapers show the mixed-race (Black/white) family on a sunny beach in a book that will delight young children, travelers or not. ©2016 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Try these early literacy activities with children:

  • Read: As you read, pay special attention to repeating characters from page to page. For example, where is monkey? How does monkey’s journey differ from the family’s journey? How about other people on the plane?
  • Talk: About other things that fly.
  • Sing: Sing, listen to, or watch “The Airplane Song” by Laurie Berkner and do the actions.
  • Write: Write a plane ticket, make a passport.
  • Play: Line up chairs to pretend you’re on an airplane! Discuss airplane safety.
  • Math or Science: With a grown-up make and play with a paper airplane. Experiment with different shapes, sizes and weights. How can you get your plane to go further or faster?

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MARCH (2)

May 16th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2017-2018 | 2017-2018 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (2))

Rescue Squad No. 9 by Mike Austin. Random House, 2016

“Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!” The distress call launches Rescue Squad No. 9 into action. A boat and helicopter and their team of rescue workers speed to the aid of a young sailor and her dog when a storm strands them on rocks. Few words are needed in this action-filled story told primarily through the illustrations. Bright colors, bold figures, and skillfully crafted page composition lend movement and a sense of urgency to this successful rescue at sea. (Ages 2–6)  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Try these early literacy activities with children:

  • Read: As you read, explore print awareness. Ask the children how they know which direction the pages should go.
  • Talk: About how loud noises can be scary, but remind children that it means people are helping others. Encourage them to look for helpers.
  • Sing: A song about the weather, the ocean or helpers.
  • Write: Trace the safety gear on the end papers of the book.
  • Play: Reenact the story. Use toy boats or other objects you can pretend are boats.
  • Math or Science: Discuss water science and safety. Look at the information in the back of the book.

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MARCH (1)

May 16th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2017-2018 | 2017-2018 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (1))

Babies Don’t Walk, They Ride! Kathy Henderson. Illustrated by Lauren Tobia. U.S. edition: Templar Books / Candlewick Press, 2016

Babies don’t just ride; they glide, stroll, roll, and more in a pleasing picture book featuring a lively cast of babies and the adults in their lives moving across the day. The rhyming text is set against vibrant, engaging detailed mixed- media illustrations that show the energy and inclusion of a multicultural city neighborhood and the many warm ways adults engage with babies in a story that ends with the quiet dark. There are many diverse babies and families to notice and follow throughout the book. The principle family appears white. (Ages 1–4)  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Try these early literacy activities with children:

  • Read: When you’re out and about, at the places like we see in the story, what words can you find?
  • Talk: Talk about what other things have wheels. Find things around you that can roll.
  • Sing: The Wheels on the Bus.
  • Write: Draw a picture of what you see when you’re out and about.
  • Play: Play with a baby doll/stuffed animal- take it for a walk or a ride.
  • Math or Science: On each page, count the babies, count windows, and count the wheels.

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MARCH (2)

May 10th, 2017 | Posted by etownsend in 2017-2018 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2017-2018 Intermediate | March - (Comments Off on MARCH (2))

Giant Squid by Candace Fleming. Illustrated by Eric Rohmann. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2016

Giant squids lives so deep in the ocean that few have ever been seen. Scientists have had to piece together a complete picture based on just parts of the creatures that have been found, mostly inside sperm whales caught by fisherman. Candace Fleming’s haunting narrative captures the mystery and the majesty of this amazing animal, once thought to be a sea monster. The moody realistic illustrations create a strong sense of being deep undersea, and include a stunning double-fold-out page showing a giant squid reemerging from the shadows of the murky ink it has shot to protect itself from a barracuda. An author’s note provides more information, including fascinating tidbits such as the fact that there are more photographs of Mars than of giant squid. Honor Book, 2017 Charlotte Zolotow Award ©2017 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How does the illustrator keep the squid mysterious?
  2. What did you learn about the giant squid? What do you still want to know?
  3. Look at the diagram at the end. List three adaptations of the giant squid.
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