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The 2018 Collaborative Summer Library Program theme is Libraries Rock!  Here are ROW titles to for reading, listening, singing, dancing and more!

Summer 3
Bird in a Box by Andrea Davis Pinkney. Little, Brown, 2011 Ages 8-12   This novel set primarily in 1937 builds Read more.
Summer 3
Janis Joplin: Rise Up Singing by Ann Angel.  Amulet, 2010 Age 14 and older   Janis Joplin’s transformation from member of Read more.
Summer 2
Good Enough by Paula Yoo. HarperCollins, 2008 Age 13 and older   Patti Yoon is a first-generation Korean American high school Read more.
Summer 1
Yellow Flag by Robert Lipsyte. HarperCollins, 2007 Age 14 and older   Teens who dream of NASCAR racing will feel as Read more.
Summer 1
If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth.  Arthur A. Levine / Scholastic, 2013 Age 11 and older   Read more.
Summer 1
Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegacki. Illustrated by Qin Leng. Kids Can Press, 2014 Ages 4-8   Hana’s decision to Read more.
Summer 1
The Beatles Were Fab (and They Were Funny) by Kathleen Krull and Paul Brewer. Illustrated by Stacey Innerst. Harcourt, 2013. Ages Read more.
Summer 2
Rock & Roll Highway: The Robbie Robertson Story by Sebastian Robertson. Illustrated by Adam Gustavson. Henry Holt, 2014 Ages 9-13 Read more.
Summer 3
The Lucy Variations by Sara Zarr. Little, Brown, 2013 Age 13 and older   Eight months ago, Lucy, a classically Read more.
Summer 2
Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxanne Orgill. Illustrated by Francis Vallejo. Candlewick Press, 2016 Age 10 Read more.
Summer 1
Alphabet Family Band by Sarah Jones. Blue Manatee Press, 2017 The musical members of a large, multiracial family demonstrate their Read more.
Summer 2
Diez deditos / Ten Little Fingers and Other Play Rhymes and Action Songs from Latin America by José-Luis Orozco. Illustrated by Read more.
Summer 3
Little Pig Joins the Band by David Hyde Costello. Charlesbridge, 2011. Ages 2-5   Little Pig suffers the fate of Read more.
Summer 2
Penny and Her Song by Kevin Henkes. Greenwillow / HarperCollins, 2012. Ages 4-7   Kevin Henkes’s debut titles for beginning Read more.
Summer 3
Max Found Two Sticks by Brian Pinkney. Simon and Schuster, 1994. Ages 3-7   On a day when Max doesn’t feel Read more.

 

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Intermediate Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Summer - (Comments Off on Intermediate Summer 2019 (3))

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Yang, Gene Luen. Prime Baby. Illustrated by Derek Kirk Kim. Roaring Brook Press, 2010. 64 pages 
( 9781596436121)

Age 9 and older

Eight-year-old Thaddeus is jealous of his new baby sister, Maddie, and wants nothing to do with her until he realizes she’s a gateway for an alien invasion. His first clue: her single syllable babble (“ga”) is always vocalized in strings of prime numbers. When the aliens finally emerge—from small pods Maddie throws up–they turn out to be “missionaries of smiles and happy feelings.” This is a disappointment to Thaddeus, while the government locks Maddie away regardless. Thaddeus is more than willing to exploit his parent’s resulting distress for personal gain. But then he recognizes the look on his sister’s face in her isolation room as one all too familiar to him: loneliness. First published in the New York Times Magazine, Gene Luen Yang’s smart, funny graphic novel is hilarious from its first page (“my mother’s womb is a Trojan horse”) to its last. Smiles and happy feelings indeed.  ©2010 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Intermediate Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Summer - (Comments Off on Intermediate Summer 2019 (2))

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Love
Ann and Jane Drake. The Kids’ Book of the Night Sky. Illustrated by Heather Collins. Kids Can Press, 2004. 144 pages (0-55337-357-X)

Ages 7 – 12

This compendium of facts, folklore, and hands-on activities will delight young stargazers and provide them with a wealth of information about astronomy. Chapters on the moon, the stars, the planets, and the sky in each season all suggest something to make, from a planisphere to a star clock, and/or do, from a celestial scavenger hunt to a game of Night Sky “I Spy.” (Younger children will need help with some of the activities, but there is enough variety to offer something for children of many ages.) The authors’ fresh, lively narrative offers up plenty of science along with brief, breezy versions of traditional lore from peoples around the world. The clear, concise information is never confused by its juxtaposition with folklore or by the humorous contexts in which it is sometimes presented (such as the interview with an aging star). The two-color artwork in blue and black is often unremarkable, but works well when it matters here – diagramming a project, or showing specific information about aspects of the night sky. © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Intermediate Summer 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Summer - (Comments Off on Intermediate Summer 2019 (1))

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Losure, Mary.
Isaac the Alchemist: Secrets of Isaac Newton, Reveal’d. Candlewick Press, 2017. 163 pages (978–0–7636–7063–4)

How do you recount the life of a 17th-century scientist in a way that is captivating for youth? One way is to make it magical. Isaac Newton grew up at a time when there was little or no distinction between magic and science. His mathematical discoveries are what helped firmly distinguish between the two; even so, he never gave up his belief in alchemy. Here, Newton is profiled from childhood on as a singular intelligence. He didn’t often relate well to people, but he was brilliant and passionate in pursuit of his interests, from alchemy to math to mechanics. Although details about his childhood in particular are not abundantly known, Losure creates a vivid sense of the time and place in which he grew up, including ample information about alchemy, which so fascinated Newton. Near volume’s end, after recounting how Newton’s discoveries transformed understanding in physics and astronomy in particular, Losure writes, “This magician, this last sorcerer—the greatest of all alchemists—was the same man who banished magic from the scientific world.” End matter in this highly readable volume includes glimpses of Isaac’s notebooks, and excerpts from some of the alchemy books of his time, as well as source notes and bibliography.  ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Primary Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Primary | Primary (Grades K-2) | Summer - (Comments Off on Primary Summer 2019 (3))

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Grey, Mini. Toys in Space. U.S. edition: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013. 32 pages (978–0–307-97812–7)

Ages 4-8

“That summer night, for the first time the toys were left outside. The sun went down, the sky grew dark, and, for the very first time … they saw THIS.” This being the dazzle of the stars in the sky. It’s overwhelming for some of them, and when Blue Rabbit asks for a story, WonderDoll spins a tale of a starry sky, and a spaceship, and a sad, glove-like alien called the Hoctopize who beams up seven toys left out in yard, hoping to find its lost Cuddles. Mini Grey’s warm, witty adventure features a cast of distinctive characters in a sweetly funny story. The seven toys left out in the yard are not only the characters in WonderDoll’s story, but provide an ongoing commentary about it. Dynamic illustrations incorporating panels and speech bubbles are an essential part of the humor.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Primary Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Primary | Primary (Grades K-2) | Summer - (Comments Off on Primary Summer 2019 (2))

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Sayre, April Pulley. Stars Beneath Your Bed. Illustrated by Ann Jonas. Greenwillow Books / HarperCollins, 2005. 24 pages (0-06-057189-6)

Ages 5-8

Poetry and science grace one another in a lyrical picture book about dust. Sayre’s narrative begins with reference to a fire-painted sky in the morning -— the result of dust in the atmosphere scattering light. It ends by describing the pink, orange and red palette of sunset -— also the result of dust. In between, Sayre examines many of the ways dust is created: dirt flies when we ride our bikes, when a meerkat digs, when cheetahs chase gazelles; cotton rubs off our jeans and becomes dust; so does the smoke from burning toast or the eyelash of seal. “Old dust stays around . . . That dusty film on your computer screen / might have muddied a dinosaur.” And there is dust that comes from outer space: “The dust beneath your bed might be from Mars . . . or a bit of the moon.” Who knew? Dust may be small, but Sayre invites readers to consider it as an extraordinary element in the grand scheme of nature. A short prose narrative at the end of the book provides additional scientific information about dust and expands on information referenced in the poetic text. Ann Jonas’ bright water-color illustrations are a simple, strong backdrop for the words. (MS) ©2005 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Primary Summer 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Primary | Primary (Grades K-2) | Summer - (Comments Off on Primary Summer 2019 (1))

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Aston, Dianna Hutts. Moon Over Star. Illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. Dial, 2008. 32 pages (978-0-8037-3107-3)

Ages 7-10

In the summer of1969, young Mae feels growing anticipation as the hour for the moon landing draws near. “A spaceship would land on the moon today, / And I dreamed that maybe one day, / I could go to the moon, too.” Mae and her cousins pretend to be the astronauts, and she is full of facts to share—about the moon being 240,000 miles away, and about President Kennedy’s declaration in 1961 that America would land on the moon. As the family gathers around the television to watch Neil Armstrong take the first steps on the moon, even Mae’s grandpa, who thinks money spent on the space program could do so much more good here on earth, seems impressed. “I reckon that’s something to remember,” he says. As for Mae, it’s something to inspire dreams. Dianna Hutts Aston’s poetic narrative is set against Jerry Pinkney’s stirring graphite, ink and watercolor illustrations in which scenes of African American Mae and her family are interspersed with the vision of her imagination and the astronauts’ experiences in space.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

BTP Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Summer - (Comments Off on BTP Summer 2019 (3))

book coverRay, Mary Lyn. Stars. Illustrated by Marla Frazee. Beach Lane, 2011. 32 pages (978–1–4424-2249–0)

Ages 2-6

“A star is how you know it’s almost night. / As soon as you see one, there’s another, and another. / And the dark that comes doesn’t feel so dark.” From opening pages that show the first evening star appearing in a dusky blue sky to the final image of a dark night sky strewn with an array of stars, Mary Lin Ray’s lyrical words and Marla Frazee’s luminous illustrations describe the stars all around us. A star cut from shiny paper and pinned to shirt designates a sheriff, or can convert a stick to a wand ideal for wish-making. There are days when you can feel “shiny as a star,” and days when the opposite is true. And stars can be found in many places: in the white flowers of strawberry plants before they bear fruit, in falling snowflakes, and as dandelion seeds blown into the air. Illustrations show a diverse cast of children and families finding the stars in their world in a child-centered picture book that ends with them gathered as a group watching nighttime stars appear in the sky above. These are temporarily obscured by the bloom of firework stars before reappearing as they always do, “every night. Everywhere.”  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

BTP Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Summer - (Comments Off on BTP Summer 2019 (2))


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Wilson-Max, Ken. Max’s Starry Night.  Jump at the Sun / Hyperion, 2001. 24 pages (0-7868-0553-6)

Ages 2 – 4

When young Max and Little Pink, his pig, go outside to wish on a star, Big Blue, his elephant, is afraid to come because it’s too dark. The next day, Little Pink teases Big Blue about being afraid, until Max points out that Little Pink is afraid of swinging on the high swings, but Big Blue never teases him. Then Max comes up with a way for all three of them to enjoy the stars in this sweet and satisfying story set against bold, richly colored paintings and featuring a creative, brown-skinned child.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

BTP Summer 2019 (1)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers | Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Summer - (Comments Off on BTP Summer 2019 (1))


Barton, Byron. I Want  to Be an Astronaut. Thomas Y. Crowell, 1988. 32 pages (0-694-00261-5)

Ages 3-6

“I want to be an astronaut/a member of the crew/and fly on the shuttle/into outer space…” proclaims the young female protagonist of this simple poetic story of high aspirations. Barton’s bold figures of astronauts, shuttles, and satellites and Planet Earth are set against a deep blue background suggesting the vastness of outer space.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | High School | Summer - (Comments Off on High School Summer 2019 (3))

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Duyvis, Corinne. On the Edge of Gone. Amulet Books/Abrams, 2016. 456 pages (978-1-4197-1903-5)

Age 14 and older

It’s 2035 and a comet is headed toward Earth. Preparations for the inevitable destruction have fallen along class lines – those who can afford it, or who have critical skills, are set to escape on self-sustaining generation ships. Those who can’t are staying in underground shelters with little hope of long-term survival. Biracial Denise, her drug-addicted mother, and her trans sister don’t come close to qualifying for safe passage on a generation ship but Denise is determined to get the three of them on board, even it means lying or sneaking on. Denise has autism – sometimes that hinders her, sometimes it helps, but always it is just part of who she is and how she views the world. Set in a futuristic Amsterdam, this compelling novel is tense, visceral, and extremely well crafted. It also offers a thoughtful exploration of ethical dilemmas: What would you be willing to do to survive? Whom would you save? And, in the face of pending doom, who deserves to live and who is expendable? ©2017 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

High School Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 High School | High School | Summer - (Comments Off on High School Summer 2019 (2))

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Rusch, Elizabeth.
Impact! Asteroids and the Science of Saving the World. Photographs by Karin Anderson. (Scientists in the Field) Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017. 76 pages (978–0–544–67159–1)

Age 10 and older

“About once a year, a car-size asteroid strikes the Earth … roughly every five thousand years, the Earth is struck by an asteroid as big as a football field.” And then there are the really big ones every few million years—the kind that can trigger a global disaster. (Think dinosaurs.) How do scientists understand the past and potential future impact of asteroids on earth, and calculate risk? It’s work that takes place on many fronts, from amateur meteorite hunters to geologists studying craters of long-ago impacts to asteroid hunters, both amateurs and professional scientists, monitoring space using telescopes on the ground and orbiting the earth. Each kind of research and monitoring plays an important part in understanding asteroids and identifying potentially hazardous asteroids. The men and women introduced here share their fascination with their work, as well as things some readers may find surprising. (e.g., “A lot of science is writing … You are always trying to convey what you’ve done or what you’re hoping to do.”). The inviting design includes ample color photographs and graphics, while a final chapter, “How to Save the World,” offers fascinating theories on how we might try to divert a potentially devastating asteroid from impact. ©2018 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

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