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Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!

July 3rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!)

Just a few words to describe the Read On Wisconsin 2016-2017 Book Selections!

Find the 2016-2017 school year Read On Wisconsin titles here! Just click on the Books tab above or here for the complete list!

Get a preview some of the upcoming September ROW books by clicking on the images below!

Or, get a sneak peek at all of the ROW September titles on Pinterest Pinterest_Badge_Red[1]

babies and doggies book

drum deam girlroller girltiger boymarch book 2boys in the boat

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So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!

May 27th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | Summer - (Comments Off on So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!)

Find some Wisconsin teacher and librarian approved summer reading titles here! Grab a book and head outdoors to enjoy the summer sunshine and super stories! Check out the books below by clicking on the image to read the CCBC annotation for the title!

Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

night soundsbuilding our housewho's that baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary (grades K-2)

farmer will allenxander's panda partymy cold plum lemon pie bluesy mood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intermediate (grades 3-5)

problem with being slightly heroicemerald atlasloon summer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle School

mira in the present tenselittle blog on the prairiehoudinithehandcuffking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High School

100 sideways mileslove is the drugsilhouette of a sparrowvanishing point

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Bedtime to Building: Summer 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles

May 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | Summer - (Comments Off on Bedtime to Building: Summer 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles)

night soundsNight Sounds by Javier Sobrino. Translated Icon_PreSchoolfrom the Spanish by Elisa Amada. Illustrated by Emilio Urberuaga. Icon to identify Summer Reading BooksU.S. edition: Groundwood, 2013.

When the sleeping animals of the rain forest are awoken by loud cries issuing from a box, their first instinct is to pacify the crier by providing whatever it needs. Cold? An orangutan fetches a warm blanket. Thirsty? A tapir provides a bowl of fresh water. Scared? A rhinoceros brings a doll for company. Momentarily placated each time, the crying quickly resumes with a new request. Finally a tiger delivers the little one’s Mummy—an elephant!—and it appears that all will be able to sleep again at last. Imagine their frustration when “wuu wuu wuuuuu” echoes through the forest yet again. These wails are coming from the village, and it’s the baby elephant who shouts advice, “It wants a kiss! That child must have a kiss! Then we can all go back to sleep.” Featuring creatures of southern and southeast Asia, this bedtime tale sports intense of colors, varied emotions, and droll comedy, including the incongruity of an elephant (no matter how young) fitting inside a small wooden box.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Building Our House by Jonathan Bean. Farrar Straus building our houseGiroux, 2013.

A young girl describes her family’s effort over the course of eighteen months to build the house in which they will live. A trailer placed on the land they’ve purchased provides shelter, while the dad, mom, two kids, and extended family and friends provide the labor and lots of love. Seasons change and change and change again as a hole is dug, the foundation is poured, and beams are hewn (by hand) and fitted together before a roof and sides go on. Then work begins inside. “We plumb while the wind howls. And wire while the drifts pile up.” Jonathan Bean’s warm, , well-crafted story is both playful and informative, full of intriguing details described in a narrative in which every thoughtfully chosen word and carefully placed comma shapes the wonderful flow. There are also whimsical details and elements of the story told only through the art, whether it’s the kids playing under the wheelbarrow, the antics of the cats, or the progression of the mom’s pregnancy and the arrival of a new baby by the time they move out of the trailer and into the finished house. An already captivating picture book includes a note in which Bean writes about his parents and the five years they spent building a house by hand. He includes photographs of himself and his sisters, all young children, engaged in the process. Honor Book, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

who's that babyWho’s That Baby? New Baby Songs by Sharon Creech. Illustrated by David Diaz. Joanna Cotler / HarperCollins, 2005.

Who are you, baby / newly born / who’s this little babe?” The opening, title poem of this picture book collection asks this and many other questions. In response, Sharon Creech offers fifteen perspectives on what much-loved babies may see and hear and think and feel as the adults in their lives cuddle them and coo at them, play with them and read to them, sing to them and sway with them, and, above all, surround them with love. Creech’s poems, playful and tender, have been illustrated with great warmth and touches of whimsy by David Diaz in this lovely volume.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Engage with Nature: May 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Toddlers

April 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | May - (Comments Off on Engage with Nature: May 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Toddlers)

mommy mommyMommy! Mommy! by Taro Gomi. Translated Icon_PreSchoolfrom the Japanese. U.S. edition: Chronicle, 2013.

A sweetly comical board book features a pair of chicks repeatedly searching for their mother. “Mommy! Mommy!” There she is, behind the fence. “Here I am!” Now she’s behind the shrubs, only her ruffled pink frill visible. But it turns out to be a flower. “Oops!” Is that her behind the rocks? Yikes! It’s something large and pink and frilly with gnashing teeth. How about peeking out behind the roof of the barn? No, it’s the rippled sun rising. But who’s that next to the sun? It’s mommy! Taro Gomi’s spare, repetitive text is funny, but the real charm is in the stylized illustrations featuring two big-eyed, boxy chicks with the suggestion of tail feathers, and their bigger boxy mother, not to mention the rectangular pink menace. Young children will enjoy the humor and drama both.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Read: Mommy! Mommy!
  • Talk: What do you call the grown-ups you live with?
  • Sing: Sing “Where is Thumbkin?”
  • Play: Play hide and seek.

What Will Hatch? by Jennifer Ward. Illustrated by Susie what will hatchGhahremani. Walker / Bloomsbury, 2013.

Eggs of eight different animals are presented with a few carefully selected words (“Sandy ball”) paired with the question “What will hatch?” An equally spare answer (“Paddle and crawl – Sea turtle”) augments the illustration of the brand-new juvenile. A balanced array of animals goes beyond birds (goldfinch, penguin, and robin) to include a caterpillar, crocodile, platypus, sea turtle, and tadpole. Egg shapes are die-cut, with the page turn cleverly revealing the result of each hatching. A few pages of additional information at the book’s end introduce young children to the term “oviparous” and relate egg facts for each species (time in egg, parents’ incubation behavior, number of siblings). Simple gouache on wood illustrations, while not always strictly representational, are consistently lovely with a warm palette of gold, green, and brown.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find activities and ideas for What Will Hatch at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Read: Find other books about the animals in this book.
  • Sing: Put some dried beans in a plastic egg and create an egg shaker. Dance and sing along to your favorite songs.
  • Play: Take a plastic egg and hide something inside and have your child guess what it is. Now, have your child hide something inside the egg and you guess what is inside.
  • STEM: Name animals that hatch from eggs. Count all the eggs in the book.

see what a seal can doSee What a Seal Can Do by Chris Butterworth.  Illustrated by Kate Nelms.  Candlewick Press, 2013.

“If you’re down by the sea one day, you might spot a seal, lying around like a fat sunbather or flumping along the sand.” Lyrical, descriptive language and appealing mixed media illustrations highlight the characteristics and behavior of gray seals. Diving deep, catching mackerel, evading a killer whale on the hunt, and returning to the beach to sleep are some of the events in one gray seal’s day. While a large-font narrative tracks the seal’s activities, offset single sentences in a smaller italicized type add snippets of relevant factual information.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find out more about the author and illustrator at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Read: Take a look at the index at the back of the book and go back to the pages of the various topics. Visit the websites mentioned on this page.
  • Talk: Name things a seal can do and name things you can do.
  • Write: Seals eat fish. With your child, make a list of the things your child eats. Encourage them to draw a picture of the things they eat. Take this list with you when you go grocery shopping.
  • STEM: Talk about the seals’ habitat. Test what floats and what doesn’t float in your sink or tub.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!

April 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | May - (Comments Off on Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!)

mommy mommywhat will hatchsee what a seal can do

 

 

 

me janetiny creatureslook up bird watching

 

 

 

 

 

rules of summerbrown girl dreamingbird kingvango

story of owen

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Enjoy Nature with April 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles

March 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | April - (Comments Off on Enjoy Nature with April 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles)

baby animal farmBaby Animal Farm by Karen Blair. Icon_PreSchoolCandlewick, 2014.

A group of five racially diverse toddlers visit a baby animal farm in this board book sure to invite noisy participation from the toddlers with whom it is shared. On each page, the toddlers in the story interact with baby farm animals, their actions coupled with a matching sound. Throughout the farm visit, one of the children is looking for his missing teddy bear, which is obligingly returned by a playful puppy by story’s end. All of it is conveyed in a minimal, rhythmic text (“Follow the ducklings. ‘Quack, quack, quack.’ Chase the chicks. ‘Cheep, cheep, cheep’ ”) and tidy illustrations in cheery watercolors  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Resources for Baby Animal Farm available at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Talk: Talk about animals sounds and encourage your child to make some.
  • Sing: Sing “Old MacDonald Had a Farm”.
  • Write: Find some pictures of farm animals and have your child trace the outlines of the animals. Talk about the size and shape of each animal.
  • Play: Visit a farm. Enjoy a picnic.

Call Me Tree = Llámame árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez. call me tree Translated by Dana Goldberg. Children’s Book Press / Lee & Low, 2014.

“I begin / Within / The deep / dark / earth.” A child imagines himself a tree, beginning as a seed that pushes through the earth, reaching and rising to discover other trees all around. Maya Christina Gonzalez pays tribute to both trees and children, affirming the beauty of each in a picture book that pairs a bilingual (English/Spanish) text with lush, colorful illustrations that convey something magical in their literal depiction of children embodying trees. Together, the text and illustrations work as a both an imaginative flight of fancy and as a stirring, strong statement about the importance of nature and value of all children: “All trees have roots / All trees belong.”  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find excellent resources — video of author reading book as well as teacher’s guide – at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Talk: This book is written in English and Spanish? What other languages do you hear or speak. What is the Spanish word for tree?
  • Write: Practice writing with a tree branch in some sand or dirt.
  • Play: Try the yoga tree pose. What other yoga poses can you try?
  • STEM: Go for a walk and observe different trees.

wolfsnailWolfsnail: A Backyard Predator by Sarah C. Campbell. Boyds Mills Press, 2008.

Drama on a small scale unfolds in this introduction to the wolfsnail, a gastropod that feeds on snails and slugs. A sentence or two per page and large close-up photos document a wolfsnail as it follows a slime trail across a hosta leaf in search of prey. After a brief retreat into its shell when a bird lights nearby, the wolfsnail catches a small snail and uses its tooth-lined tongue to scoop the meat from the shell. A glossary, fact page, and additional information on wolfsnails are included at the book’s close.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Educator and librarian resources for Wolfsnail available at TeachingBooks.net.

  • Talk: Reinforce new vocabulary by labeling the body parts on a picture of a wolfsnail.
  • Write: Take photos and write some words to describe them.
  • Play: Move slowly and crawl like a snail or a slug.
  • STEM: What were some interesting facts you learned about a wolfsnail? Drip some water on a leaf and watch it roll. Try other liquids like cooking oil, milk, juice and syrup. Find a recipe to make some slime.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!

March 23rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | April - (Comments Off on Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!)

baby animal farmcall me treewolfsnail

meow ruff

 

 

benjamin bear's bright ideas

african acrostics

mr lemoncello

if i ever get out of here

silver people

Click on any book cover image to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!

March 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | March - (Comments Off on Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!)

socksifyouwereadogfirefly july

what forest knows

flora and ulysses

stubby the war dog

scavengers

falling into place

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Great Books for Literacy Activities: March 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

February 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | March - (Comments Off on Great Books for Literacy Activities: March 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

socksSocks! by Tania Sohn. Kane Miller, 2014.Icon_PreSchool

A little girl’s love for socks of all types — “yellow socks so I can play [soccer] … daddy socks,” Christmas stockings, socks that she turns into puppets, others she pretends are an elephant’s trunk — culminates with a pair of extra special socks that arrive in the mail: “Beoseon! Traditional Korean socks, from Grandma.” The simple text is set against clean-lined, appealing illustrations showing a small girl of Korean heritage, and a playful black-and-white kitten that is almost as enamored of all the different socks as she is!  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Read: Socks!
  • Talk: Talk about the patterns and colors on the socks in the book. What colors are the different socks?
  • Play: Make sock puppets. Let your child make names and characters for their puppets. Put on a puppet show for each other.
  • STEM: Sort laundry, find pairs, and talk about patterns.

If You Were a Dog by Jamie A. Swenson. Illustrated by Chris ifyouwereadogRaschka. Farrar Straus Giroux, 2014.

“If you were a dog, would you be a speedy-quick, lickedy-sloppidy, scavenge-the-garbage, Frisbee-catching, hot-dog-stealing, pillow-hogging, best-friend-ever sort of dog? Would you howl at the moon? Some dogs do.” A playful picture book full of fresh turns of phrase asks similar questions about being a cat, fish, bird, bug, frog, and even a dinosaur in author Jamie Swenson’s merry offering that is sure to invite role-playing (be prepared for moon-howling and dinosaur stomping in story time). Chris Raschka’s whimsical illustrations are a perfect match for Swenson’s imaginative outing that concludes with the very best thing of all to be: a kid! Highly Commended, 2015 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Read: If You Were a Dog
  • Talk: Talk about the different words and phrases used to describe the animals in the book. What words would you use to describe yourself, a pet, or a friend.
  • Write: Do some watercolor painting in the spirit of this book’s style.
  • Play: Encourage role play and pretend to be the different animals depicted in the book.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

ROW February 2016 Selections! Engaging Reads! Check Them Out Below!

February 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | February - (Comments Off on ROW February 2016 Selections! Engaging Reads! Check Them Out Below!)

mouse who ate the moonmooncakes  grandma and the great gourdhttp://readon.education.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/little-roja-e1440433353684.jpgsugargracefully grayson port chicago 50      http://readon.education.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/shadow-hero-e1440432919341.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow! We’ve got super appealing, accessible books for children and young adults this February here at Read On Wisconsin! The Shadow Hero is a multi-layered graphic novel about a Chinese American super hero in 1940’s America sure to appeal to a wide array of readers from middle school through high school. We also have some absolutely riveting non-fiction from award-winning author, Steve Sheinkin. Port Chicago 50 is difficult to put down. And, those are just the high school selections.

Check out all of this month’s titles below. Click on the book cover image for the CCBC annotation of the book, links to resources from TeachingBooks.net, and discussion prompts or early childhood activities.  Tell us what you think of this month’s titles @ReadOnWI.

A Month of Moon Stories: February 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

January 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | February - (Comments Off on A Month of Moon Stories: February 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

mouse who ate the moonThe Mouse Who Ate the Moon by Petr Horáček. U.S. edition: Icon_PreSchoolCandlewick Press, 2014.

Little Mouse is so struck by the beauty of the moon that she wishes she could have a piece of it to keep. The next morning, her wish has come true when she wakes up and finds a yellow crescent outside her hole. It smells so good! It turns out to be tasty, too. She eats half of her piece of the moon before sadly realizing the moon won’t be round anymore. Luckily, her friends Mole and Rabbit reassure her that she didn’t really eat the moon. Deep-hued illustrations with occasional die-cuts are the backdrop for a gently humorous story that never makes fun of Little Mouse while giving young listeners the satisfaction of understanding Little Mouse’s mistake early on: Her piece of the moon is clearly a banana, although that’s never stated.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources for this book at TeachingBooks.net.

Talk: Talk about the different foods and their shapes. What are some special things you do with your family? Are there special foods you eat with your family?

Sing: Play a recording of “I’m Being Followed By a Moon Shadow” and sing along.

Play: Play peek-a-boo! Create finger shadow puppets. Host a tea party for family, friends, toys or dolls.

STEM: Discuss the different shapes and phases of the moon.

Mooncakes by Loretta Seto. Illustrated by Renné Benoit. Orca, 2013.mooncakes

A young Chinese North American girl describes her first time staying up to celebrate the autumn Moon Festival. There are round mooncakes to eat. “They make a circle for me and Mama and Baba. They make a circle for my family.” There are round paper lanterns to light. And there is the circle of Mama and Baba’s arms. The night also includes storytelling as the parents share three Chinese legends about the moon with the little girl. They are the perfect length for stories parents would tell a small child, and so integrate seamlessly into the narrative of this picture book that is full of warmth. It’s in the simple, beautiful language, and in the loving depiction of family. The story’s cozy feel is echoed in the illustrations’ warm tones. Discovering that the three legends are reflected in the decorations on the family’s teapot adds to the pleasure.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources for this book at TeachingBooks.net.

Read: Look at maps of the world. Find China and North America. What other countries can your children find?

Talk: Talk about holidays that your family celebrates. What foods does your family eat on these special occasions. Why is this important to your family?

Sing: Sing a favorite holiday song with children.

Write: Draw different holiday foods and let your child decorate them with crayons, paint, sequins, beads or sprinkles.

STEM: Bake a treat with children. Explain the need to follow a recipe. Talk about the steps needed to make the treat. What would happen you followed the steps in the recipe out of order?

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

A New Year! Start it Right with these January 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles

December 15th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | January - (Comments Off on A New Year! Start it Right with these January 2016 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles)

lion and the birdThe Lion and the Bird by Marianne Duboc. Translated Icon_PreSchoolfrom the French by Claudia Z. Bedrick. U.S. edition: Enchanted Lion, 2014.

A picture book of great tenderness begins with a lion raking his yard. When a bird from a flock flying high overhead is injured, the lion bandages the bird’s wing, but the flock moves on — autumn is clearly waning. So the lion and the bird spend a snug winter together, warm in his cozy home, sometimes venturing out for some cold-weather fun, the bird tucked into his mane. “It snows and snows. But winter doesn’t feel all that cold with a friend.” Spring brings warm weather, and the return of the other birds. It’s time for the lion and the bird to part. Time passes, lion carries on his solitary life, then it’s autumn again and he wonders about his friend. There is an absence, an ache, and, finally, sweet joy. Marianne Dubuc’s picture book is told largely through beautifully composed, muted illustrations that make use of both full-page spreads and spot illustrations surrounded by white space, with brief lines of lovely narrative punctuating the images every so often. There is a film-like quality to the visual storytelling in this rich, emotionally resonant tale.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Read & Talk: On the wordless spreads, ask your child to describe what is happening. Let your child have time with this activity. Use a bookmark so you can come back to the story. Ask your child what their favorite season is and why?
  • Write: Together with your child, write a letter to someone they love that lives far away and take a trip to the post office to mail your letter. Create a bookmark for the book.
  • Play: Take care of a friend, toy, or imaginary friend by hosting a tea party. Find out what they like they to eat. Act out some of the activities in the book like fishing, sledding, and gardening.
  • STEM: Provide dried beans or seeds. Feel them, count them, sort them or plant them in a cup. While sorting, create charts and graphs.

Nest by Jorey Hurley. A Paula Wiseman Book / Simon & Schuster,nest 2014.

A single word per double-page spread takes very young children through a year in the life cycle of a robin, from “nest” to “hatch” to “explore,” eventually ending with another “nest.” The simple narrative is an accompaniment to the uncluttered, striking, stylized illustrations, each of which is an artful work of graphic design. The art strongly and realistically conveys the beauty of the changing seasons and the drama within and beyond the natural world, as on the “jump” page, where the robins sit in a tree just out of the reach of an eager and interested cat, or “surprise,” which as a purple kite on a taut string flying above their treetop resting place. An author’s note provides additional information about robins.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Talk: Talk about the four seasons with your child.
  • Sing: Sing “Two Little Blackbirds Sitting in a Tree”. Now replace blackbirds with robins and other birds.
  • Write: Collect leaves. Ask children to trace the different parts of leaves – stem, outline, veins – with their fingers. Point out curved and straight lines on the leaves and how letters are made of straight and curved lines.
  • STEM: Go for a walk and observe nature. When spring comes, place four inch strands of yarn on tree branches for nest building. Discuss the order of the events in the book.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

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