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Sweet Bedtime Stories: December 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

November 15th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2015-2016 | December - (Comments Off on Sweet Bedtime Stories: December 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

chengduChengdu Could Not, Would Not Fall Asleep by Icon_PreSchoolBarney Saltzberg. Disney / Hyperion, 2014.

While everyone else in the bamboo grove slumbers, a panda named Chengdu is tossing, twitching, scrunching, rolling, even hanging upside down, but no matter what he does he can’t fall asleep. His eye-popping, wide-awake visage is one of the charms of a picture book in which the black and white panda is once shown as nothing but big open eyes. He finally climbs up high in a tree and finds a perfect spot to slumber. Too bad for his brother Yuan it’s right on top of him. A witty and wonderfully paced pairing of text and illustrations will definitely charm young readers and listeners, with occasional fold-out and varied trim-size pages adding to the fun. Honor Book, 2015 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Early literacy activities for both books below.

It Is Night by Phyllis Rowland. Illustrated by Laura Dronzek. it is nightGreenwillow / HarperCollins, 2014.

Originally published in 1953 with illustrations by the author, an almost stream-of-conscious bedtime book is given a cozy, comforting new look with the warm, rich hues and soft, soothing, curved lines of Laura Dronzek’s art. The narrative ponders where a variety of animals and objects might sleep at night. “Where should a sleek seal rest his head? On the quiet beach of a faraway island, or safe in an island cave.” A dog in a doghouse “can keep his eye on the stars and see that they don’t bump into the moon.” Rooster and rabbit, elephant and mouse, not to mention a train and dolls “big and small” are all considered. But do any of them sleep in the places imagined? “No! They sleep in the bed of one small child … ALL OF THEM.” It’s a familiar ritual of childhood made fresh.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

For both books:

  • Read: Find other books about plants, animals, and the solar system.
  • Talk & Write: Talk about your bedtime routine. Make a list of your bedtime routine as your child describes the routine and hang the list by your child’s bed. Encourage your child to draw a picture of each routine.
  • Sing: Sing a favorite or traditional lullaby together. For example, “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.”
  • Play: Have your child get their favorite doll or toy ready for bed.
  • STEM: Collect twigs, stones, leaves and other natural materials. Which of these materials do you think animals would use in their habitats? Why?

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Counting and More: November 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

October 23rd, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | November | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on Counting and More: November 2015 Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

gastonGaston by Kelly DiPucchio.  Illustrated by ChristianIcon_PreSchool Robinson.  Atheneum, 2014.

Mrs. Poodle is the proud parent of Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, Ooh-La-La, and Gaston. The first three are spitting images of their mother. And Gaston — well, he clearly comes from different stock. Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, Ooh-La-La are poofy and puffy and the size of teacups, while Gaston is solid and stocky and as big as a teapot. But if being dainty and delicate and neat like their mother doesn’t come as easily to Gaston, he always “worked the hardest, practiced the longest, and smiled the biggest.” Then the family meets Rocky, Ricky, and Bruno, three stocky, solid bulldog pups, and their poofy, puffy sister, Antoinette. “It seems there’s been a terrible mistake,” says Mrs. Bulldog. And so the two puppies trade places. The problem is, “Antoinette did not like anything proper or precious or pink.” And Gaston didn’t like anything “brutish or brawny or brown.” Kelly DiPuccio’s delightful romp gets even better as the pups return to their original families, and eventually have pups of their own who are encouraged to be whatever they want to be. It’s a tongue-in-cheek look at nature versus nurture, but also an affirmation of being true to oneself.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Talk about manners. What are examples of good manners? “Oui” is the French word for yes. What other ways can you say “yes”?
  • Write: Draw a map of your home and label the different rooms.
  • Play: Play a matching game or game of memory.
  • STEM:Challenge your senses by comparing and contrasting different textures. Look at the illustrations in the book. How are the dogs the same and how are they different?

We All Count: A Book of Cree Numbers by Julie Flett. Native Northwest, 2014.we all count cover

Read a review by Debbie Reese from her blog, American Indians in Children’s Literature.

Check out this book trailer from the iSchool at The University of British Columbia.

Resources from TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Read: Find other books about the animals shown in this book.
  • Talk: What languages do you speak? Who are the people in your family? Do you have cousins, aunts, uncles?
  • STEM: Point and count as your share the book. Count to 10 with your child.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Find ROW November Titles Here!

October 19th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | November | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Find ROW November Titles Here!)

Click on an image to read the CCBC annotation for the title. Check earlier posts below for discussion prompts and resources! And, Read! On Wisconsin!

we all count covergastonbully

 

 

ivan the remarkable true storyarcady's goalkinda like brothers

etched in claymad pottertin star

 

October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | October | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on October 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

shh! we have a planShh! We Have a Plan by Chris Haughton. U.S. edition: Candlewick Icon_PreSchoolPress, 2014.

Four wide-eyed hunters are trying to catch a bird in a net. Make that three hunters; the fourth—and smallest–member of their party just wants to be friendly (“Hello, birdie.”). The group’s comical, not-so-stealthy pursuit of the bird features one failed attempt after another, with a pattern emerging as the youngest one greets the bird, the others shush their small companion (“We have a plan”), and then counting to three before they pounce….on nothing as the bird has already flown away. The spare, droll narrative is set against marvelous visual storytelling. The stylized illustrations are in shades of deep blue with black and white, against which the brightly colored red bird stands out. Young readers and listeners will be reciting along and laughing out loud, with the delight heightened by two big surprises as the story draws to a close.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Shh! We Have a Plan at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask children why the character with the plan kept saying “Shh!”
  • Play: Hide a toy and give your child some clues as to where it may be. Now have your child hide a toy and give you the clues.
  • STEM: Take a walk with children and look for animals. How many different type of animals did you see? Talk  about how the animals are similar and how they are different.

Go, Shapes, Go! by Denise Fleming.  Beach Lane, 2014.go shapes go

A small toy mouse on wheels commandingly directs a variety of shapes — squares, circles, ovals, arcs, and rectangles — in different sizes — big, small, thin, tiny — to slide, roll, flip, and fly into the form of a monkey. When the mouse suddenly crashes into the monkey, the shapes reform into a bounding cat. Mouse quickly tames the shapes back into the safer monkey mode. Denise Fleming’s trademark painted-paper collage, uncomplicated text, and comfortable pace make this book an engaging introduction to shapes, sizes, and movement for younger children, as well as to the concepts of parts and wholes, as separate shapes create concrete objects.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for Go, Shapes, Go! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Letter knowledge begins with shapes. What shape does the letter A look like? Think about other letters and their corresponding shapes.
  • Write: Draw shapes in sand, shaving cream or pudding
  • Play: Act out the actions from this book – slide, bounce, roll, slither, flip, march, leap, scoot, fly, twirl, hop!
  • STEM: Discuss the different shapes you see in this book and talk about the shapes you see in your daily lives.

i am so braveI Am So Brave by Stephen Krensky. Abrams Appleseed, 2014.

In this slim board book, a young brown-skinned boy tells of overcoming his fears. Each fear is resolved in a way that allows the boy to feel safe, content, and brave. The boy’s obvious pride at overcoming his fears is reflected in the straightforward text and bright graphic-design-style illustrations in primary colors with brown, black, and white. Many of the boy’s fears are common childhood worries — barking dogs, loud traffic noises, bedtime darkness, being separated from Mom and Dad — that all parents and children will easily recognize. The boy’s solutions to his fears offer positive, encouraging responses to the anxiety that many children may feel in new or uncomfortable situations.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

More resources for I Am So Brave! at TeachingBooks.net.

Engage children with these early literacy activities:

  • Talk: Ask your child what they can do now that they couldn’t do when they were younger. How does that make you feel to be able to do all of those things now?
  • Sing: “If You’re Happy and You Know It”. Replace happy with different emotion words like grumpy, scared, or excited.
  • Play: Take turns with children acting out different emotions and guessing the emotions.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Our October Titles!

September 18th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | October | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Our October Titles!)

Find out more about these titles! Click on the book cover to read the annotation! Check out resources from TeachingBooks.net for links to teaching guides, videos, author interviews and more for all of the titles below! And, now, check out the posts below for discussion prompts, annotations, and prompts for each title.

Cover for book i am so braveBook cover to go shapes gobook cover of Shh! We Have a Planbook cover for sam and dave dig a holebook cover for gravity

book cover for separate is never equal

book cover for madman of piney woodsswallowscreaming staircsehow it went down

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers

August 28th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | September | 2015-2016 - (Comments Off on September 2015: Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers)

My Busmy bus by Byron Barton. Greenwillow / HarperCollinIcon_PreSchools, 2014.

What could be more appealing to toddlers than a book about a bus driver and his canine and feline passengers? A book in which those cats and dogs are driven to a boat (“They sail away”), a train (“They ride away”), and a plane (“They fly away”). Finally there is only one dog left. “My dog,” says the bus driver. “Bow wow.” Classic Byron Barton, the illustrations feature bright colors, rounded shapes, and flat perspective, as well as priceless expressions on the faces of the cats and dogs. Barton’s winning book offers the opportunity to count on every page spread (anywhere from one to five), not to mention bark and meow with wild abandon.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

  • Talk: About the traffic signs in the book. Ask children to point to signs they recognize.
  • Sing: Sing the Wheels on the Bus with your child.
  • Write: For letter awareness, point out the traffic signs in the book. Ask children to trace the shapes and letters on the sign.
  • Play: Try a round of Red Light, Green Light or Mother May I.
  • STEM: Count the dogs on the bus? Count the cats on the bus? Count the total. Caregivers: Notice the use of ordinal numbers (first, second, third, etc.) Discuss, other first, second, and thirds in daily routines.

mommies and their babiesMommies and Their Babies (Black And White) by Guido van Genechten. Translated from the Dutch. Clavis, 2012

daddies and their babies

Daddies and Their Babies (Black And White) by Guido van Genechten. Translated from the Dutch. Clavis, 2012.

Two simple board books show animal parents and their offspring, using the correct name for the young: “snake mommy with her baby snakelet,” “crocodile daddy with his baby hatchling,” and so on. But it’s the warmth of the relationships captured in the striking black-and-white illustrations that really is the point. The illustrations’ bold shapes and shading create great visual interest for very young children, while the round eyes of the creatures in each pair gaze upon one another with affection and delight.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center.

  • Talk: The language of books is richer than the language of conversation, more rare words are used. Point out new words to your child as you read these books.
  • Write: Draw a picture of your own family and label who is in it.
  • STEM: Count the number of people in your family.

Find more early literacy activities from the Youth Services Section of the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2015 Early Literacy Calendar created by Youth Services librarians across Wisconsin.

Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Summer Titles: Enjoy the Outdoors with These Books

June 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | Summer - (Comments Off on Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Summer Titles: Enjoy the Outdoors with These Books)

oscarshalfbirthdayOscar’s Half Birthday by Bob Graham. U.S. edition: Candlewick Press, 2005.

Oscar’s family celebrates his six-month birthday with a walk to their neighborhood park, a rather lopsided cake, and a rousing chorus of “Happy Birthday,” sung by family members and the strangers who have gathered around to admire baby Oscar. Although the birthday boy is the center of attention, the real star of the show is his three-year-old sister, Millie, who wears coat-hanger fairy wings on her back and a dinosaur puppet on her left hand, symbolic of her dual nature. “A little more fairy and a little less dinosaur,” her mother chides her gently when Millie’s play is a bit too vigorous for little Oscar. Bob Graham’s depiction of a slightly offbeat, interracial family is right on target: Millie, in her behavior and dialogue, is the quintessential three year old, commanding the attention of both her parents and the book’s readers, while Oscar remains, for the most part, completely oblivious to the fuss being made over him. The parents, young and hip, are everything good parents should be: caring, attentive, firm, and, above all, they seem to truly enjoy both of their children. Graham’s trademark pen-and-ink and watercolor paintings show a diverse cast of characters living in a working class neighborhood. Highly Commended, 2006 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

globalbabiesGlobal Babies by Global Fund for Children. Charlesbridge, 2007.

“Wherever they live, wherever they go, whatever they wear, whatever they feel, babies everywhere are beautiful, special, and loved.” These sentiments are spectacularly captured with sweet and stunning photographs of babies from around the world. Babies from Mali and Spain, the United States and Thailand, Iraq, Guatemala, and beyond are included in this board book. Swaddled in colorful cloth, wrapped in warm fur, or tucked into cradling arms, these babies are an affirmation of love.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

beach tailA Beach Tail by Karen Lynn Williams. Illustrated by Floyd Cooper. Boyds Mills Press, 2010.

Swish-swoosh.” The sound of waves washing the shore repeats throughout an engaging picture book in which a young African American boy is the architect of his own adventure. After Gregory draws “a Sandy lion” in the sand at the beach, his dad cautions, “Don’t go in the water, and don’t leave Sandy.” And Gregory doesn’t, but as the tail he draws on Sandy gets longer and longer, it takes him farther and farther away from his dad: over an old sand castle, around a horseshoe and a ghost crab, all the way to a jetty. “But Gregory did not go in the water, and he did not leave Sandy.” It’s only when he finally looks up that Gregory realizes how far he’s gone. He turns a moment of worry—which one of those distant figures sitting on towels is his dad?–into masterful problem solving when he follows Sandy’s tail over and around all the objects, back to his dad’s welcome smile. Floyd Cooper’s sun-washed, sandy illustrations are the perfect accompaniment to this terrific picture book narrative. Highly Commended, 2011 Charlotte Zolotow Award (MS) ©2010 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

summer days and nightsSummer Days and Nights by Wong Herbert Yee. Christy Ottaviano Books/Henry Holt, 2012.

“Summer days, so warm and bright, / Paint my room in morning light.” A small Asian girl describes her activities over the course of a single summer day in a quietly engaging narrative that sees her butterfly-chasing in the morning followed by a dip in the wading pool, then on an afternoon picnic with her parents. Nighttime finds the hot, restless child looking out the window and then heading out for a discovery-rich walk in the moonlight with her dad. “Across the field, on past the gate … My eyelids droop, it’s getting late.” Wong Herbert Yee’s story is perfectly sized for the hands of toddlers and preschoolers, with a gentle ambience that is both playful and reassuring. The illustrations have a softness and warmth that add to the comforting feel, as does this realistic family, which includes a pregnant mom and a dad clad in chinos, undershirt, and fedora.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

owlbabiesOwl Babies by Martin Icon to identify Summer Reading BooksWaddell.Icon_PreSchool Illustrated by Patrick Benson. Candlewick Press, 1992, 1996.

Listen: Podcast featuring Owl Babies from the CCBC.

ROW 2015-2016 Book Lists are HERE!

May 29th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on ROW 2015-2016 Book Lists are HERE!)

After much hard work and diligence from the Read On Wisconsin Literacy Advisory Committee and the CCBC librarians, the Read On Wisconsin book selections are now complete for the 2015-2016 year.

Please check out the NEW 2015-2016 Read On Wisconsin Books here or on the Books page of the website. And, spread the word!

ROW Ambassador for May: Super Storytime with Max and the Tag-Along Moon

May 13th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | May - (Comments Off on ROW Ambassador for May: Super Storytime with Max and the Tag-Along Moon)
Reading Max and the Tag Along Moon! We enjoyed a lot of interaction from the kids during the story!

Reading Max and the Tag Along Moon. We enjoyed a lot of interaction from the kids during the story!

Display of Moon Books

Display of Moon Books

Our May ROW Ambassador, Arlene Mabie, the library director at Hawkins Area Library, shared May 2015 title, Max and the Tag-Along Moon by Floyd Cooper in a moon-themed story time.

From book displays for the Early Literacy and Preschool programs to read alouds to make it and take it activities, Arlene found clever ways to share this lovely and loving story about Max and his grandfather with her little library patrons. After enjoying the story, the kids made their own tag-along moon mobiles, complete with glow in the dark paint and glitter.

Thanks, again, to Arlene Mabie, her preschool storytime kiddos, and the Hawkins Area Library.

Concentrating on applying glitter and glow-in-the-dark paint to her moon.

Excited little readers sharing their own Tag Along Moons

Excited little readers sharing their own Tag Along Moons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you using Read On Wisconsin books in engaging and educational ways at your library, in your child care environment or at home? We’d love to hear about you, your kiddos and literacy activities with Read On Wisconsin books! Contact Read On Wisconsin and share your ideas! You could be one of the next ROW Ambassadors!

May 2015 Titles for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: A Month of Discovery!

May 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | May - (Comments Off on May 2015 Titles for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: A Month of Discovery!)

max and the tag-along moonBTPMax and the Tag Along Moon by Floyd Cooper. Philomel, 2013.

Max discovers the moon is a constant companion on the drive home from his Granpa’s house. “The long ride home was swervy-curvy. This way and that, all the way. And the moon seemed to tag along.” Wonderful word choice chronicles Max’s journey home with the moon overhead, until “Dark clouds tumbled across the night sky.” The moon his Granpa said would always shine for him has disappeared. But as he’s falling asleep, the clouds fade and the moon returns. Floyd Cooper captures the magic of the moon and a grandparent to a small child in this picture book about a young African American boy. Cooper’s hallmark illustration style is especially adept at reflecting the wonder of moonlit landscapes. Highly Commended, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start a conversation with children about the Max and the Tag-Along Moon:

1. How does Max feel when he says goodbye to Grandpa?

2. Why can’t Max see the moon? Why does the moon disappear in the story?

3. Find the arrows on Max’s ride home.

wait! wait!

Wait! Wait! by Hatsue Nakawaki. Translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko. Illustrated by Komako Sakai. U.S. edition: Enchanted Lion, 2013.

A series of typical toddler encounters are captured in a few simple lines of text accompanying illustrations that excel at depicting both the fascination and frustration that are part of a toddler’s experience. The story is told in pairs of page spreads. Over the course of the picture book, the young child on the cover notices a butterfly, a lizard, and two pigeons. “Wait! Wait!” But just as the child gets closer, the creatures flutter or wiggle or flap away. Help finally comes in the form of a grown-up, who picks the child up to ride, shoulder-high. Hatsue Nakawaki’s art has a nostalgic but not sentimental feel, and masterfully reflects the physical relationship of small children to the world around them. There is rich word choice in the spare text.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Engage children during or after reading Wait! Wait! with these prompts:

1. Where did the animals go?

2. Point to the flowers.

3. Which animals can fly?

nino wrestles the worldBTP

Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press, 2013.

A young, masked, underwear-clad boy takes on one opponent after another as he imagines the toys strewn on his floor as full-size wrestling rivals. Luckily, Niño has a series of patented moves to guarantee victory. He does in the Guanajuato Mummy with the Tickle Tackle. Olmec Head is defeated by the Puzzle Muzzle move. And El Chamuco is ruined with the Popsickle Slick. But the ticking clock warns of coming dread: “His sisters’ nap is over. Time for Niño to tangle with Las Hermanitas!” Has Niño met his match in these two darling, diaper-clad girls? A vibrant picture book that integrates Spanish words and expressions into the English text is a dynamic and engaging portrait of a child’s pretend play. Full of energy and humor, Yuyi Morales’s words and pictures will have young readers and listeners cheering. An author’s note provides information about Lucha libre, a “theatrical, action-packed style of professional wrestling that’s popular throughout Mexico and many Spanish-speaking countries.” Niño’s story is rich with specific cultural references but universal in appeal. Among the elements adding to the fun are endpapers offering profiles of Niño and all his opponents. Highly Commended, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center.

Continue the fun and adventure of reading Niño Wrestles the World with these questions:

Icon_PreSchool1. How do you use your imagination when you play?

2. Do you pretend to be other people or characters? Who do you like to pretend to be?

3. The author attended  the Lucha Libre wrestling matches with her dad when she was a little girl. Is there some special activity you like to do with a family member?

Brand New! Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors!

April 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Brand New! Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors!)

This month we started a trial program called Read On Wisconsin Ambassadors! We’ll have different youth services librarians from across Wisconsin showcase some of the engaging, educational and easy ways that they are integrating Read On Wisconsin titles into their library programming and outreach.

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Heide Piehler, Youth Service Librarian, shares one of April’s R.O.W. titles Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore during the Shorewood Public Library Preschool Story Time.

For April 2015, our ROW Ambassador is Heide Piehler from the Shorewood Public Library.

Here’s what Heide told us about her storytime with April 2015 ROW titles, Lucky Duckling by Eva Moore: “I read stories about lost ducklings. We compared the pictures of the traffic stop in Lucking Ducklings to the one in Make Way for Ducklings. I had also printed photos of actual duckling rescues to demonstrate how a story in a book can be based on an actual event. …

 Heide Piehler, Youth Service Librarian, shares one of April’s R.O.W. titles Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore during the Shorewood Public Library Preschool Story Time.

Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore, one of the April R.O.W titles, is featured in Shorewood Library’s duck-themed preschool story time.

 

In between stories, we did duck themed finger games and sang duck themed songs like Six Little Ducks. We also talked about we’d name ducks and created ducks with “feathers in the back” out of peep chicks.” 

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Inspired by the R.O.W. featured book Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore and the song Six Little Ducks, Shorewood Library’s story time preschoolers create their own little ducks with “feathers in the back.”

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Duck “with the feathers in the back” Peep!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Heide Piehler and the Shorewood Public Library for the time, creativity, extra work and photos!

Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles for April: My First Day / Lucky Ducklings / Wee Rhymes

April 1st, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | 2014-2015 | April - (Comments Off on Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers Titles for April: My First Day / Lucky Ducklings / Wee Rhymes)

my first day

My First Day by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. Illustrated by Steve Jenkins. Houghton Mifflin, 2013.

1. Where is the baby?

2. What is the mother doing?

3. Can you find the baby’s eyes? What other body parts can you find?

 

lucky ducklings

Lucky Ducklings by Eva Moore. Illustrated by Nancy Carpenter.  Orchard / Scholastic Inc., 2013.

1. How many baby ducks can you count?

2. Who helped save the ducklings?

3. What would you name a baby duckling?

 

wee rhymesWee Rhymes: Baby’s First Poetry Book by Jane Yolen. Illustrated by Jane Dyer.  A Paula Wiseman Book/Simon & Schuster, 2013.

1. Find a poem that rhymes. Which words in the poem rhyme?

2. Do the poems describe any things you like to do?

3. What’s your favorite poem? Why do you like it?

 

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