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Amazing Read Alouds and Highly Discussable Titles for October 2016!

September 16th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Amazing Read Alouds and Highly Discussable Titles for October 2016!)

Looking for a read aloud for your classroom or your library or at home? Looking for suggestions for independent reading, book groups, or reader’s advisory? Try some of the titles below. Find annotations, discussion questions and TeachingBooks.net resources for all of the October 2016 titles in the previous posts below! You can find our complete list of 2016-2017 Read On Wisconsin titles here. If you’re only interested in titles for a specific age group, try our age group icons on the right side of this site.

bear ate your sandiwch

hoot owl

penny and her marble

poem in your pocket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hiawatha and the peacemaker

funny boneshoodoodumplin

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Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table Author Visits Wisconsin!

September 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Summer - (Comments Off on Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table Author Visits Wisconsin!)
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A Beautiful, Big Welcome from Gaenslen School!

Jacqueline Briggs Martin, the author of Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table, one of ROW’s summer reading suggestions for elementary age kiddos, and her editor and publisher at Readers to Eaters, Philip Lee, made inspired visits to Orchard Ridge Elementary School in Madison and Gaenslen School in Milwaukee! With the help of super school media specialist, Sam Skar at Orchard Ridge, and Susan Plewa at Gaenslen, we had a enthralled audience and an uplifting time! We also had the amazing opportunity to meet Will Allen and visit his urban farm, Growing Power, in Milwaukee!

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Farmer Will Allen, Philip Lee of Readers to Eaters, and Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Jackie talked to 3rd and 4th graders at each school about food, family stories around food and the writing process. Her visit was a welcome treat at the end of the school year. Several young writers were thrilled to meet a published author (Jackie) and an editor (Philip Lee).

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3rd Graders at Gaenslen with Excellent Questions!

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Orchard Ridge 4th Grade Students Engrossed in Jacqueline Briggs Martin’s Snowflake Images

Some burgeoning foodies loved learning more about urban farming and growing food. All of the kids loved hearing about Jackie’s experiences growing up on a farm surrounded by fresh fruits and vegetables and sharing their own food favorites and experiences with Jackie.

Both schools, like many in Wisconsin, have a focus on community agriculture with school vegetable gardens and a special hydroponics lab at Gaenslen.

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Susan Plewa, Jackie Briggs Martin and Philip Lee

A huge thank you to Jackie Briggs Martin and Philip Lee for visiting Wisconsin and sharing their talents and experiences with students, schools and librarians! And, another huge thank you to school media specialists, Susan Plewa and Sam Skar, who provided welcoming venues for the visit and wonderfully engaged students!

Hear about writing Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table from the author, Jackie Briggs Martin, on TeachingBooks.net.

 

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Dream Big: September 2016 Primary (K-2) Titles

August 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in September | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2016-2017 - (Comments Off on Dream Big: September 2016 Primary (K-2) Titles)

Drum Dream Girl:  How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music by Margarita Engle. Illustrated by Rafael López.  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015drum deam girl

Millo Castro Zaldarriaga was born in Cuba in the 1920s and grew up attuned to the rhythms in the world around her, and inside her. She dreamed of drumming, but only boys and men learned how to play at that time. She dared to drum anyway, “tall conga drums / small bongo drums / and big, round, silvery / moon-bright timbales … Her hands seemed to fly / as they rippled / rapped / and pounded / all the rhythms / of her drum dreams.” Her father said no when her sisters asked ten-year-old Millo to join their band. Only boys should play drums, he said. But Millo couldn’t silence the sounds. Eventually her father found her a teacher who listened to her, and taught her, and gave her the chance to change the way people thought about girls and drumming. Margarita Engle’s poem makes a striking picture book narrative and is set against the vibrating tropical colors of Rafael López’s lush illustrations. A note tells how Afro-Chinese-Cuban Millo went on to a world-famous musician who played alongside jazz greats, in addition to changing hearts and minds with her beats. Winner, 2016 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What words does the author use that make you think of drumbeats? How does the author create rhythm with words?
  2. How do the illustrations show us when Milo (the protagonist) dreams of drumming and when she is actually drumming?
  3. Why do you think Papa decided to provide a drum teacher for Milo?

Emmanuel’s Dream:  The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah by Laurie Ann Thompson. Illustrated by Sean Qualls. Schwartz & Wade, 2015

Born with only one functioning leg, Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah grew up with a mother who focused on his abilities. “He learned to crawl and hop, to fetch water and climb coconut trees.” When he grew too heavy for her to carry, he hopped two miles to school and two miles home again. “Emmanuel had a sharp mind, a bold heart, and one strong leg.” At 13, he left home for the city of Accra in Ghana to earn money to help support his family. Time and again he encountered people who assumed he couldn’t do much because of his disability. After his mother’s death, he decided to honor her last words by showing that being disabled doesn’t mean being unable, and, after much organization and planning, embarked on a bike ride across Ghana: 400 miles in 10 days, with one strong leg. An understated narrative emphasizes Emmanuel’s spirit and persistence in addition to his physical abilities, while the stylized illustrations are full of emotion. An author’s note tells of Emmanuel’s continued disability rights activism.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How is Emmanuel physically different? What challenges does he face because of his difference?
  2. How do you think Mama Comfort supports and inspires Emmanuel?
  3. How does Emmanuel show that being disabled doesn’t mean being unabled?
  4. Looking back at the book, what information do you learn from the illustrations that the text does not provide?

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Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!

July 3rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!)

Just a few words to describe the Read On Wisconsin 2016-2017 Book Selections!

Find the 2016-2017 school year Read On Wisconsin titles here! Just click on the Books tab above or here for the complete list!

Get a preview some of the upcoming September ROW books by clicking on the images below!

Or, get a sneak peek at all of the ROW September titles on Pinterest Pinterest_Badge_Red[1]

babies and doggies book

drum deam girlroller girltiger boymarch book 2boys in the boat

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So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!

May 27th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | Summer - (Comments Off on So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!)

Find some Wisconsin teacher and librarian approved summer reading titles here! Grab a book and head outdoors to enjoy the summer sunshine and super stories! Check out the books below by clicking on the image to read the CCBC annotation for the title!

Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

night soundsbuilding our housewho's that baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary (grades K-2)

farmer will allenxander's panda partymy cold plum lemon pie bluesy mood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intermediate (grades 3-5)

problem with being slightly heroicemerald atlasloon summer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle School

mira in the present tenselittle blog on the prairiehoudinithehandcuffking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High School

100 sideways mileslove is the drugsilhouette of a sparrowvanishing point

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Food, Feelings and Friends: Summer 2016 Primary Titles

May 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | 2015-2016 | Summer - (Comments Off on Food, Feelings and Friends: Summer 2016 Primary Titles)

xander's panda partyXander’s Panda Party by Linda Sue Park. Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerIllustrated by Matt Phelan. Clarion, 2013.

Icon to identify Summer Reading BooksXander wants to have a Panda Party at the zoo where he lives. But he’s the only panda there so he invites all the bears to a “bear affair” instead. Then Koala informs him that she’s actually a marsupial. “Marsupials—we’re rather rare. Will I not be welcome there?” Xander tries again, this time promising a “hearty party” for all the mammals at the zoo. But Rhinoceros refuses to come without his oxpecker bird. So Xander invites mammals and birds. Crocodile chimes in: “Birds and reptiles—long ago, we were related, don’t you know? If you didn’t, now you do. Can’t the reptiles join in too?” Finally, Xander’s friend Amanda Salamander comes up with the perfect solution in this playful picture book that cleverly integrates a little bit of science into its masterful rhyming text. Whimsical illustrations are the perfect accompaniment to the narrative, while the author’s note provides additional information about the various animals in the story.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

My Cold Plum Lemon Pie Bluesy Mood by Tameka Fryer my cold plum lemon pie bluesy moodBrown.  Illustrated by Shane W. Evans. Viking, 2013.

Jamie describes his moods throughout the day in terms of colors associated with what’s he doing. First he’s in a purple mood, eating a cold plum and drinking grape juice. Then he’s in a “gray kind of place / Storm brewing inside / That I hide / ’Cause I don’t want any trouble space” after his big brothers kick him off the couch. Green is all pleasure after his little sister asks him to draw a dragon. Black is brooding anger when his brothers tease him. Orange is energetic and upbeat, like the basketball he’s playing. Red is urgent, like a fire-engine, as he races home after the game. Dinner is yellow, is lively, is good food (corn pudding, chicken curry) and family. Blue is cool time alone as he washes dishes. The lively narrative is emotionally vivid, with word choice and line length skillfully changing the pacing to suit each mood Jamie describes. Realistic family dynamics (teasing, arguing, playing together, jostling for the biggest piece) play out in brief bits of dialogue and in the illustrations showing Jamie and the other members of his African American family. Honor Book, 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

farmer will allenFarmer Will Allen and the Growing Table by Jacqueline Briggs Martin.  Illustrated by Eric-Shabazz Larkin.  With an afterword by Will Allen.  Readers to Eaters, 2013.

As a child, Will Allen hated working in his family’s garden. “He planned to quit on planting, picking, pulling weeds, leave those Maryland fields for basketball or white-shirt work.” It turns out he did both, playing professional basketball in Belgium, then getting “white-shirt” work in Wisconsin. But while helping a Belgian friend dig potatoes during his basketball days, he made a life-changing discovery: he “loved digging in the dirt.” Living in Milwaukee after playing ball, Will noticed how few people, especially in poor neighborhoods, had access to fresh vegetables. He bought an inner city lot that included six greenhouses, got friends to donate fruit and vegetable waste to create compost, added red wiggler worms and figured out—through trial and error, and with hands-on help from neighborhood kids–how to gradually transform the polluted soil to grow healthy food. Will devised ways to use every inch of space, growing food in the ground, and also in pots and baskets and buckets and boxes. He added hoophouses for more growing room, and vats of water to raise fish. He named his venture “Growing Power,” and not only began feeding people in the city, but teaching people in his neighborhood, around the country, and around the world how to be urban farmers. This lively introduction to Will Allen’s groundbreaking work (for which he’s received a MacArthur Foundation “Genius” grant) features a buoyant narrative by Jacqueline Briggs Martin set against Eric-Shabazz Larkin’s energetic illustrations. It’s impossible not to be inspired by their account of the creativity of Will’s venture and the hope inherent in its success. (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Amazing, Enthralling Science: May 2016 Primary Titles

April 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | 2015-2016 | May - (Comments Off on Amazing, Enthralling Science: May 2016 Primary Titles)

me janeMe … Jane by Patrick McDonnell.  Little, Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerBrown, 2011.

Patrick McDonnell’s picture book about chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall as a child depicts her as a curious, scientific-minded young girl whose favorite stuffed animal was a chimpanzee named Jubilee. She took the stuffed chimp everywhere as she explored and carefully observed the natural world of her childhood … and dreamed of someday going to Africa. McDonnell’s spare and skillful text is set against beautiful, soft-toned illustrations that have a sense of playfulness even while conveying Goodall’s focus and determination. Occasional double-page spreads represent young Jane’s detailed scientific notebook full of drawings and notes. A stirring transition from illustrated story to Goodall’s adult life comes with the final page of the story, illustrated with a photo of Goodall as a young woman reaching out to touch a real chimpanzee. An author’s note about Jane Goodall and a message from Goodall herself round out this distinctive volume. Winner, 2012 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find excellent educator and librarian resources, including activities, interviews and discussion questions for Me … Jane at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Jane is curious about the natural world? What are some ways that she learned more about what interested her?
  2. What attributes did Jane have as a child that would make her a good scientist?
  3. Describe the different types of illustrations in the book? Do they tell you different types of information?

Tiny Creatures: The World of Microbes by Nicola Davies. tiny creaturesIllustrated by Emily Sutton.  U.S. edition: Candlewick Press, 2014.

Tiny creatures in vast numbers, microbes are far too small to see with the naked eye and exist in quantities hard to fathom. But Nicola Davies gives young readers and listeners a starting point for understanding their small size (millions could fit on the antenna of an ant), huge numbers (a single drop of water can hold twenty million — the number of people in New York State), their omnipresence (on sea, on land, in the air; at the back of your fridge; inside your stomach and on your skin); their variety (as different in size as ants and whales; most helpful, some harmful); and their power (turning food into compost; milk into yogurt; rocks into soil). Davies’s finely crafted, informative text is paired with Emily Sutton’s marvelous illustrations that further demonstrate and illuminate these tiny creatures that transform our world. “All over the earth, all the time, tiny microbes are eating and eating, and splitting and splitting, changing one thing into another.”  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find great resources for Tiny Creatures at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What do microbes look like? How do you know? How is this information evident in the text and illustrations in this book?
  2. Name some of the helpful or good things microbes do?
  3. What are some examples of how microbes change one thing into another? How is this illustrated in the book? Does it help to have illustrations as well as text to explain this science information?

Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!

April 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | May - (Comments Off on Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!)

mommy mommywhat will hatchsee what a seal can do

 

 

 

me janetiny creatureslook up bird watching

 

 

 

 

 

rules of summerbrown girl dreamingbird kingvango

story of owen

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Pictures and Words Make Meaning Together in the April 2016 Primary Titles

March 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | 2015-2016 | April - (Comments Off on Pictures and Words Make Meaning Together in the April 2016 Primary Titles)

benjamin bear's bright ideasBenjamin Bear in Bright Ideas! by Philippe Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerCoudray.  Toon Books/Candlewick Press, 2013.

An unusual entry in Toon’s comic series for beginning readers features one-page comic strips, each with a clever visual punchline. For example, Benjamin Bear says to a fish swimming in a bowl, “Let’s go play at your house” and, after dumping the fish in the lake, dons the upside-down fish bowl to wear as a diver’s helmet before entering the lake himself. Or, after seeing his rabbit friend jump over a stream, Benjamin Bear builds a bridge for the rabbit, who proceeds to jump over the bridge. It’s one laugh after another in this engaging easy reader. The humor is simple enough for new readers and sophisticated enough so that older children will enjoy it, too.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find lesson plans, book trailer and more for Benjamin Bear in Bright Ideas! at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What are some of the problems that bear solves?
  2. How would you describe the relationship between bear and rabbit?
  3. Which of the stories is the most realistic and which is the least realistic? Show examples for your reasoning.

Meow Ruff: A Story in Concrete Poetry by Joyce Sidman. meow ruffIllustrated by Michelle Berg. Houghton MIfflin, 2006.

Plump / bright dome / of sugary white / sky muffin.” Joyce Sidman’s descriptive cloud poem will change shape, form, and content over the course of this intriguing picture book, just like the clouds themselves. If there’s a story here, it’s of small dog and a small cat at odds with one another until a sudden storm finds them sheltering beneath the same picnic table. But the real story is the way that tale is told—in a series of concrete poems that chronicle the storm’s rise and fall, the changing relationship of the two animals, and their surroundings. The rain is represented in falling words that convey both the sight and sound of the downpour: “sudden ferocious drilling” (the storm’s onset), “stinging ropes of water” (the height of its fury), “fat fingers tip tapping” (as the rain begins to subside). A series of lovely descriptive poems also describe the tree in the yard, the grass beneath the animals’ feet, and, of course, the clouds. While some of Sidman’s poems are true concrete verse, taking the shape of their subject, others are merely suggestive of a form. Illustrator Michelle Berg’s task was to draw the characters and complete the scene, and the bold, clear, graphic design of her illustrations provide a perfect complement to Sidman’s words.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find lesson plans and more for Meow Ruff at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. What story does the book tell about the dog and cat?
  2. Give some examples of how the print looks like what it’s describing or representing? Why do you think the author and illustrator chose to show the words this way?
  3. What are some of the different voices expressed in the poems?

Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!

March 23rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | April - (Comments Off on Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!)

baby animal farmcall me treewolfsnail

meow ruff

 

 

benjamin bear's bright ideas

african acrostics

mr lemoncello

if i ever get out of here

silver people

Click on any book cover image to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!

March 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | March - (Comments Off on Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!)

socksifyouwereadogfirefly july

what forest knows

flora and ulysses

stubby the war dog

scavengers

falling into place

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Celebrate Nature with the March 2016 Primary Titles

February 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | 2015-2016 | March - (Comments Off on Celebrate Nature with the March 2016 Primary Titles)

firefly julyFirefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems by Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerPaul B. Janeczko. Illustrated by Melissa Sweet. Candlewick Press, 2014.

A smile-inducing collection of poems offers a range of perspectives on the seasons and an introduction to an array of poets both contemporary and classic. Charlotte Zolotow’s “Little Orange Cat,” Ralph Fletcher’s “Water Lily,” and Carl Sandburg’s “Window” are among subjects for Spring. Summer includes “Subway Rush Hour” by Langston Hughes and Joyce Sidman’s “Happy Meeting” in which “Rain meets dust: / soft, cinnamon kisses. / Quick, noisy courtship, / then marriage: mud.” Fall and Winter speak in the voices of William Carlos Williams, Eve Merriam, Robert Frost, Ted Kooser, and others. The brevity of the individual poems makes each one feel like a perfect little package, to be opened, sighed over, shared. Melissa Sweet’s lovely illustrations offer concrete yet whimsical images that shift stylistically, providing an appealing accompaniment to poem while maintaining a sense of unity across the pages.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find more resources for Firefly July at TeachingBooks.net, including this teaching guide from The Classroom Bookshelf and QR codes.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. How do the illustrations help us to understand the words in the poems?
  2. Describe how the words and illustrations identify the seasons?
  3. What are the differences between the fog in Carl Sandburg’s poem (p. 36) and Ever Merriam’s poem (p. 37)?

What Forest Knows by George Ella Lyon. Illustrated by what forest knowsAugust Hall. A Richard Jackson Book / Atheneum, 2014.

An inspired journey through the seasons in a wood offers a growing litany of what Forest knows, from “snow / icy branches / frozen waterfall” in winter to “buds … / waking / opening up” in spring. Forest knows “growing, / going forth … / fruit” in summer, and “gathering in, letting go” in fall. Then Forest knows snow again, and change, in everything and everyone. A picture book full of rich, evocative words moves seamlessly between ideas and concrete details of many things that might be found in the wood across the seasons. Astute observers will appreciate the dual meaning applied to “Forest” through the illustrations. The word can not only be taken as the woods personified, it can also be interpreted as the name of the brown dog seen on every page spread, exploring the woods throughout the year. Highly Commended, 2015 Charlotte Zolotow Award  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find more resources for What Forest Knows at TeachingBooks.net,

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Who or what do you think is Forest? Show examples for your opinion.
  2. In what season does the book begin? In what season does the book end?
  3. Identify words in the story that describe or show action?
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