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Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table Author Visits Wisconsin!

September 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Summer - (Comments Off on Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table Author Visits Wisconsin!)
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A Beautiful, Big Welcome from Gaenslen School!

Jacqueline Briggs Martin, the author of Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table, one of ROW’s summer reading suggestions for elementary age kiddos, and her editor and publisher at Readers to Eaters, Philip Lee, made inspired visits to Orchard Ridge Elementary School in Madison and Gaenslen School in Milwaukee! With the help of super school media specialist, Sam Skar at Orchard Ridge, and Susan Plewa at Gaenslen, we had a enthralled audience and an uplifting time! We also had the amazing opportunity to meet Will Allen and visit his urban farm, Growing Power, in Milwaukee!

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Farmer Will Allen, Philip Lee of Readers to Eaters, and Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Jackie talked to 3rd and 4th graders at each school about food, family stories around food and the writing process. Her visit was a welcome treat at the end of the school year. Several young writers were thrilled to meet a published author (Jackie) and an editor (Philip Lee).

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3rd Graders at Gaenslen with Excellent Questions!

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Orchard Ridge 4th Grade Students Engrossed in Jacqueline Briggs Martin’s Snowflake Images

Some burgeoning foodies loved learning more about urban farming and growing food. All of the kids loved hearing about Jackie’s experiences growing up on a farm surrounded by fresh fruits and vegetables and sharing their own food favorites and experiences with Jackie.

Both schools, like many in Wisconsin, have a focus on community agriculture with school vegetable gardens and a special hydroponics lab at Gaenslen.

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Susan Plewa, Jackie Briggs Martin and Philip Lee

A huge thank you to Jackie Briggs Martin and Philip Lee for visiting Wisconsin and sharing their talents and experiences with students, schools and librarians! And, another huge thank you to school media specialists, Susan Plewa and Sam Skar, who provided welcoming venues for the visit and wonderfully engaged students!

Hear about writing Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table from the author, Jackie Briggs Martin, on TeachingBooks.net.

 

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Making a Difference in the World: September 2016 Intermediate Titles

August 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in September | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) - (Comments Off on Making a Difference in the World: September 2016 Intermediate Titles)

one plastic bag smallOne Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia by Miranda Paul. Illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon. Millbrook Press, 2015

When Isatou Ceesay first noticed a piece of silky fabric on the ground in her Gambian community, she wasn’t sure what it was. “Plastic,” her Grandmother explains with a frown. Soon there is more. The bags are convenient but people discard them when they break. The litter is unsightly, and a hazard to livestock that eat it. It’s a problem that grows as Isatou reaches adulthood. Watching her sister crochet gives Isatou the idea to turn the worn bags into something useful again, and soon a group of women are transforming old plastic bags into purses after washing and cutting them into strips to crochet. The new bags are not only a solution to the litter problem but become a means of economic development in their community. Debut Wisconsin author Miranda Paul brings a storyteller’s gift for language and pacing to this picture book account based on real events and set against Elizabeth Zunon’s illustrations full of texture and color. An author’s note with more about Isatou and the ongoing initiative, pronunciation guide for the Wolof words incorporated into the narrative, timeline, bibliography, and color photographs are included in the end matter.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Pre-reading: What does your family do with plastic bags?
  2. Isatou show’s great persistence. Think of examples of other people whose perseverance impacted a broad group.
  3. How do you help your community? Does that also touch the global community?

tiger boyTiger Boy by Mitali Perkins. Illustrated by Jamie Hogan. Charlesbridge, 2015

Neel lives on one of the Sundarban islands off the coast of Bangladesh. Neel’s father has always said it’s important to protect the land and the tigers, so Neel is dismayed when Baba agrees to work for wealthy Mr. Gupta hunting a tiger cub that escaped from a nearby refuge. Everyone knows Mr. Gupta wants to sell the cub on the black market. But hardworking Baba needs extra money to hire a tutor to help Neel prepare for an upcoming scholarship exam. Neel doesn’t care about the scholarship; he has no desire to leave the island for further schooling. He does care about the little cub, however, so he and his older sister, Rupa, who wishes she could go to school, are determined to find the cub before anyone else, even Baba, and return it to the refuge. The sense of urgency that propels Neel and Rupa’s hunt for the cub creates the perfect amount of tension in an engaging story wonderfully grounded in Neel’s point of view and his experiences in his family and community. Their effort to save the cub helps Neel understand how furthering his education is one means of helping protect the place he lives. Just the right amount of information about the complexities of economic and environmental issues is seamlessly incorporated into this warm, lively chapter book featuring occasional illustrations and a satisfying and believable ending. An author’s note tells more about the islands and their environmental and economic struggles. (MS)  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Pre-reading: What does school mean to you?
  2. How does Neel feel about school? Why? How does his opinion of or feelings toward education change from the beginning of the story to the end of the story?
  3. How does the desperate situation in the story affect people’s decisions? How can one person’s actions have a profound impact on the world? Give examples from at least two characters from the book.
  4. What role does the setting play in this story?

Find a complete discussion guide from the publisher here! Find more resources for Tiger Boy at TeachingBooks.net

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Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!

July 3rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | 2016-2017 | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Middle School | High School - (Comments Off on Thrilling! Scary! Funny! Thought-provoking!)

Just a few words to describe the Read On Wisconsin 2016-2017 Book Selections!

Find the 2016-2017 school year Read On Wisconsin titles here! Just click on the Books tab above or here for the complete list!

Get a preview some of the upcoming September ROW books by clicking on the images below!

Or, get a sneak peek at all of the ROW September titles on Pinterest Pinterest_Badge_Red[1]

babies and doggies book

drum deam girlroller girltiger boymarch book 2boys in the boat

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So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!

May 27th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | Summer - (Comments Off on So Many Stories! So Many Ideas! So Many Books!)

Find some Wisconsin teacher and librarian approved summer reading titles here! Grab a book and head outdoors to enjoy the summer sunshine and super stories! Check out the books below by clicking on the image to read the CCBC annotation for the title!

Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

night soundsbuilding our housewho's that baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primary (grades K-2)

farmer will allenxander's panda partymy cold plum lemon pie bluesy mood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intermediate (grades 3-5)

problem with being slightly heroicemerald atlasloon summer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle School

mira in the present tenselittle blog on the prairiehoudinithehandcuffking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High School

100 sideways mileslove is the drugsilhouette of a sparrowvanishing point

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New Experiences and Adventures in the Summer 2016 Intermediate Titles

May 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Summer - (Comments Off on New Experiences and Adventures in the Summer 2016 Intermediate Titles)

problem with being slightly heroicThe Problem with Being Slightly Heroic by UmaIcon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readers Krishnaswami. Illustrated by Abigail Halpin. Atheneum, 2013.Icon to identify Summer Reading Books

After meeting her idol, Bollywood star Dolly Singh, in The Grand Plan to Fix Everything (Atheneum, 2011), young Dini is now caught up in the whirlwind that is life whenever Dolly is around. Dolly has come to the United States for a premier of her latest film as part of an international festival at the Smithsonian. Dini, visiting Baltimore and her best friend, Maddie, with her father while her medical mom remains in the Indian village of Swampnagiri, is determined to help Dolly have everything she needs to make the premier perfect. So she’s working with Maddie on a special dance, trying to get a baker to make the rose petal cake (what would the premier be without one?), and then there’s the matter of finding an elephant (ditto), not to mention worrying over the mystery of Dolly’s missing passport. Uma Krishnaswami’s second breezy, buoyant novel about Dini and Dolly and friends and family has no shortage of coincidences, which means, of course, everything will work out in the end. But getting there is such a pleasure. Krishnaswami’s fresh, lively writing is full of rich language and word play and an irresistible sense of fun. A great read-aloud choice, this novel will delight listeners and independent readers alike. (MS) ©2013 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

The Emerald Atlas by John Stephens. Knopf, 2011.emerald atlas

From the publisher:

A snowy winter’s night. Three small children are chased from their home by the forces of a merciless darkness. Ten years later, Kate, Michael and Emma are no closer to the truth about what separated their family.

The answer lies with an enchanted atlas.

Brimming with action, humor, and emotion, The Emerald Atlas is the first stage of a journey that will take Kate, Michael, and Emma to strange, dangerous lands and deep within themselves. It is the story of three children who set out to save their family, and end up having to save the world.

Also, watch the trailer, read an excerpt from the book or just find out more about the books and author at the imaginative Emerald Atlas website.

loon summerLoon Summer by Sandy Gillum. Field Notes Press, 2008.

Five individuals contributed the extraordinary photographs that accompany ecologist Sandy Gillum’s captivating account of a loon family on a small Wisconsin lake. A few days after the male loon appears, his mate arrives. The pair is soon taking turns sitting on two eggs in their artificial island nest (the island was built by nearby residents especially for loon nesting). Not long after, two fluffy black chicks are accompanying the loon parents on the water, or sometimes hitching a ride on their backs. Scientists band the babies and check on the already-banded adults. All is well . . . until a rogue loon appears on the scene. When the family disappears not long after the rogue loon’s arrival and increasing threats, an observer who has been watching the drama unfold since spring fears the worst for the chicks, who cannot fly. To her amazement, she finds both the adults and chicks over the course of the next two days. The ungainly-on-land birds have portaged over rough, unfamiliar terrain, waddling with the young loons across dry land to a safe new home one-quarter mile away. (MS) ©2008 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Surprises Around Every Corner! with May 2016 Intermediate Titles

April 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | May - (Comments Off on Surprises Around Every Corner! with May 2016 Intermediate Titles)

look up bird watchingLook Up! Bird-Watching in Your Own Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersBackyard by Annette LeBlanc Cate. Candlewick Press, 2013.

“You may not have a yard, but you do have the sky. Look up!” Busy pages and cartoon-like conversation bubbles encourage reluctant naturalists to give birding a chance by emphasizing how easy it is to do anywhere, from the window of a city apartment building to suburban backyards and beyond. Bird-watching requires no expertise and few supplies, but close observation—watching and listening—is key. There’s a wealth of information about bird appearance and behavior packed into this slim, highly visual volume in which author/illustrator Annette LeBlanc Cate shares her enthusiasm for and knowledge about birding, along with her silly sense of humor, with young readers.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find multiple lesson plans and interviews for Look Up! at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: What adventures can you have close to home?
  2. If you went birding and found ten birds, how would you classify them?
  3. What story does the map tell?
  4. How does this book combine information and narrative?

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan. Arthur A. Levine Books /rules of summer Scholastic, Inc., 2014.

Shuan Tan’s imagination always harbors a rich and arresting world of possibilities. Here the wild and the extraordinary is found in paintings accompanying a simple, straightforward narrative in which a young boy states the things he learned last summer. “Never leave a red sock on the clothesline.” The accompanying illustration shows the boy and his brother huddled against a stark fence in an uninviting urban landscape. The single red sock on the clothesline, small and unassuming in the foreground, has attracted (one assumes) the giant, menacing, red rabbit-like creature that lurks on the other side of the fence. “Never argue with an umpire.” Especially, one gathers, when the umpire is your big brother, never mind the mechanical creature that is your opponent. There is both tension and whimsy in the relationship between what is stated and what is shown. A brief, wordless series of page spreads in the middle, preceded by “Never wait for an apology” and followed by “Always bring bolt cutters” underscores the slightly ominous yet playful feel of the entire volume. Is it all meant to be real? Surreal? Symbolic? The beauty is that it’s up to each individual reader of the words and images to decide.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find helpful resources for educators and librarians for Rules of Summer at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: What are your rules of summer?
  2. How do the illustrations and text work together to tell the story?
  3. How can the illustrations change the meaning of the text?
  4. Do you ever get told not to do something and you don’t know why?

Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!

April 20th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | May - (Comments Off on Naturalists, Artists, Dreamers: Ready for Adventure with ROW May 2016 Titles!)

mommy mommywhat will hatchsee what a seal can do

 

 

 

me janetiny creatureslook up bird watching

 

 

 

 

 

rules of summerbrown girl dreamingbird kingvango

story of owen

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Games Galore in the April 2016 Intermediate Titles

March 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | April - (Comments Off on Games Galore in the April 2016 Intermediate Titles)

african acrosticsAfrican Acrostics: A Word in Edgeways by Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersAvis Harley. Photographs by Deborah Noyes. Candlewick Press, 2009.

Animal lovers, poetry appreciators, and puzzle fiends will all find something to appreciate in this collection of poems about birds and animals of the African savannah. Most of Avis Harley’s clever descriptive poems are traditional acrostics, in which the first word of each line spells out a word relating to the poem’s subject. But some are more devious—there are double acrostics, which feature words spelled from both the beginning and end letters in each line, multiple acrostics—one poem has five imbedded vertical words—and other variations on the acrostic form. Accompanying each poem is full-page photograph of the animal subject. Photographer Deborah Noyes took most of the photos in Namibia and includes a note about that experience. Brief additional notes about each of the animals, and a more lengthy explanation of the acrostic form, round out this unusual volume. (MS) ©2009 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find more resources at TeachingBooks.net.

Start conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: Both of these books (African Acrostics and Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library) feature puzzles. What is your favorite type of puzzle?
  2. How do the text and pictures work together to add meaning to this book?
  3. How did the acrostic part of the poem add to the meaning of the poem?
  4. How does this book use puzzles? To enhance setting? To share information? To add detail?

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library: A Puzzle Mystery bymr lemoncello Chris Grabenstein. Random House, 2013.

Check out this comprehensive list of resources for Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library and more on the author’s website: Chris Grabenstein: fast-paced fun reads for young(er) readers.

Find even more resources at TeachingBooks.net.

Start conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: Both of these books (African Acrostics and Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library) feature puzzles. What is your favorite type of puzzle?
  2. Solving puzzles helped the characters win the challenge. What else helped them?
  3. Teamwork gave some kids an advantage. How did the book show this?
  4. How does this book use puzzles? To tell a story? To create tension? To enhance setting?

Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!

March 23rd, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | April - (Comments Off on Wild Variety in the April 2016 ROW Selections! Check Them Out NOW!)

baby animal farmcall me treewolfsnail

meow ruff

 

 

benjamin bear's bright ideas

african acrostics

mr lemoncello

if i ever get out of here

silver people

Click on any book cover image to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!

March 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | March - (Comments Off on Our March Titles are Here! Check Them Out!)

socksifyouwereadogfirefly july

what forest knows

flora and ulysses

stubby the war dog

scavengers

falling into place

Click on any of these book cover images to learn more about that book! Read an annotation from the CCBC! Find discussion questions and activities as well as links to TeachingBooks.net and all of their fabulous resources!

Tales of Extraordinary Bravery: March 2016 Intermediate Titles

February 24th, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | March - (Comments Off on Tales of Extraordinary Bravery: March 2016 Intermediate Titles)

flora and ulyssesFlora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Icon for the Intermediate (Grades 3-5) readersKate DiCamillo. Illustrated by K. G. Campbell. Candlewick Press, 2013.

Flora’s been pretty cynical since her parents’ divorce. She spends most of her time reading superhero comics while her self-involved mom works on her next romance novel and her dad, with his lack of confidence, flounders. But when Flora sees a hapless squirrel sucked up by a vacuum, she’s on the scene in an instant performing CPR (she learned it in the back of a comic book). “For a cynic I am a surprisingly helpful person,” she thinks. The squirrel not only lives, but is changed by the experience. He understands what Flora says. And he can write—poetry no less—plunking out deep, thoughtful verses on the typewriter belonging to Flora’s mom. Flora names him Ulysses (for the model of vacuum that was almost his demise) and thinks of him as a superhero in real life. Ulysses may not be able to save the world, but he just might be able to save Flora, restoring her belief in friendship and family. Kate DiCamillo’s witty, wonderful work of magical realism is patently absurd with its flights of fancy and wordplay, but that’s its charm. The lively prose narrative is punctuated by interludes of black-and-white panel illustrations by K. G. Campbell that showcase small vignettes of action while referencing the comic-book form.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find resources for Flora and Ulysses, including links to 8 lesson plans at TeachingBooks.net!

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: Both stories (Flora and Ulysses and Stubby the War Dog) use headlines. What would be the headline for your life today?
  2. How do the text features affect the story? How do the illustrations affect your understanding of the story and the characters?
  3. How does the mother change throughout the story? Why does the mom want to get rid of Ulysses? What does the mom say that’s hurtful and why?
  4. Why do you think that the boy pretends to be blind? How would the story and characters change if the boy didn’t pretend to be blind?

Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s stubby the war dogBravest Dog by Ann Bausum. National Geographic, 2014.

As he was training for duty overseas in 1917, Pvt. J. Robert Conroy bonded with a stray dog at the training camp. Conroy named the dog Stubby due to his stub of a tail, and smuggled him on board his ship when he headed for France. Stubby was so smart and so personable that he quickly became the unofficial mascot for Conroy’s division. On the battlefield, Stubby proved his worth by locating fallen soldiers and staying with them until help arrived, and warning the unit of poison gas. He earned a medal for bravery when he captured a German soldier. After the war, Stubby’s reputation and fame continued to grow. Author Ann Bausum did extensive primary research through documents, photos, and mementos at the Smithsonian, which has taxidermy Stubby in its collection, and one of the intriguing aspects of her narrative is occasional comments on the challenges of separating fact from fiction, since even stories written when Stubby was alive were prone to hyperbole. She also interviewed Conroy’s grandson, who shared memories of his grandfather and his stories about Stubby. Numerous photographs of Stubby, Conroy, and other memorabilia are an integral part of a volume that includes a timeline, extensive bibliography, and wonderful research notes.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Check out the great resources for TeachingBooks.net!

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading: Both stories (Flora and Ulysses and Stubby the War Dog) use headlines. What would be the headline for your life today?
  2. Can you identify any primary sources in the book? How do the primary sources affect the story?
  3. Make a timeline of Stubby’s Story.
  4. How do animals help people through difficult times? What examples can you find in this book? Which of Stubby’s feats impressed you most?

ROW February 2016 Selections! Engaging Reads! Check Them Out Below!

February 1st, 2016 | Posted by etownsend in Babies, Toddlers and Preschoolers | Primary (Grades K-2) | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | 2015-2016 | Middle School | High School | February - (Comments Off on ROW February 2016 Selections! Engaging Reads! Check Them Out Below!)

mouse who ate the moonmooncakes  grandma and the great gourdhttp://readon.education.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/little-roja-e1440433353684.jpgsugargracefully grayson port chicago 50      http://readon.education.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/shadow-hero-e1440432919341.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow! We’ve got super appealing, accessible books for children and young adults this February here at Read On Wisconsin! The Shadow Hero is a multi-layered graphic novel about a Chinese American super hero in 1940’s America sure to appeal to a wide array of readers from middle school through high school. We also have some absolutely riveting non-fiction from award-winning author, Steve Sheinkin. Port Chicago 50 is difficult to put down. And, those are just the high school selections.

Check out all of this month’s titles below. Click on the book cover image for the CCBC annotation of the book, links to resources from TeachingBooks.net, and discussion prompts or early childhood activities.  Tell us what you think of this month’s titles @ReadOnWI.

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