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Join the Adventure: October 2015 Primary Titles

September 24th, 2015 | Posted by etownsend in Primary (Grades K-2) | October | 2015-2016

sam and dave dig a holeSam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett. Illustrated by Primary Icon of a White-Tailed DeerJon Klassen. Candlewick Press, 2014.

Sam and Dave are on a mission: They plan to keep digging until they “find something spectacular.” When digging straight down doesn’t yield results, they turn to the right. Then they split up. They come back together and start digging down again. They take a rest. And all along, their dog — and readers and listeners — understand what they don’t: they keep missing one spectacular thing after another. The straightforward narrative is the foil for the marvelous visual storytelling in a hilarious picture book in which Sam and Dave manage to miss gemstone after gemstone, each one bigger and more spectacular than the one before. The last one is so big the page can’t show it all. When they stop to rest again, dirty and done in by their effort, they are mere inches above a bone. While Sam and Dave sleep the dog starts digging and suddenly all of them are falling … falling … falling … only to land right back where they began … or do they? Brilliantly conceptualized and illustrated, this is truly a book for all ages.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find book trailers, story hour kit and other resources for this title at TeachingBooks.net

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts:

  1. Before reading the book: What are some reasons why Sam and Dave would want to dig a hole?
  2. In the pictures, how is the place where Sam and Dave begin their adventure different from where they end up?
  3. The characters say, “We won’t stop digging until we find something spectacular?” What do you consider spectacular? Did they find something spectacular? What about the dog, did it find something spectacular?
  4. What story does the text tell? What story do the pictures tell? How are they different?

Gravity by Jason Chin. A Neal Porter Book / Roaring Brook Press,gravity 2014.

In an engaging introduction to gravity, a day at the beach unexpectedly turns into a surprising science lesson. In the first few pages, a young cape-clad boy plays with his spaceman and rocket ship on the rocky beach until he discovers a book on gravity. The boy is drawn into the book and soon his toys and other earthly objects are illustrating gravitational principles. The toy spaceman, rocket ship, pail, and shovel, along with a nearby pitcher of lemonade, spin above the earth. Jason Chin explains that without gravity the moon and the sun, just like the toys, would drift away from the earth. “Gravity keeps the earth near the sun, the moon near the earth,” and gravity also keeps objects on the earth. Punctuated text — a few short words per page — provides an accessible definition of gravity and its effects. The accompanying illustrations complement and reinforce the text while the story offers humor and a narrative structure in this simplified, but not diminished, explanation of a complex concept.  © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Find STEM and literacy resources for Jason Chin’s Gravity at TeachingBooks.net.

Start some conversation with these discussion prompts?

  1. This book is about gravity. What does this book want us to know about gravity?
  2. How do the illustrations help you to understand gravity?
  3. This book combines fiction and non-fiction to relay information and to tell a story. Which parts do you think are fiction? Which parts are nonfiction? Why?

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