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Soar into space and into the imagination with our Summer 2019 titles, aligned to this year’s Collaborative Summer Library Program theme, “A Universe of Stories!”

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

 

 

Icon to identify Summer Reading Books

 

 

“There are birds falling out of the sky.

“I’m not an expert on bird behavior or anything, but I’m pretty sure birds aren’t just supposed to fall out of the sky.” (from Roll by Darcy Miller)

 

Find out more about falling birds in Roll and our other ROW titles for May below.

 

2018-2019 Bookmarks

“Rise / into the wonder / of daybreak. / Be a rainbow in the cloud. / Be a free bird on the back of the  night wind. / Shine on, honey!”  (from “Majestic–celebrating Maya Angelou” by Kwame Alexander in Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets)

 

Find out more about Out of Wonder and other ROW titles for April below.

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

“In the bathroom, I looked at my reflection in the mirror and made a face when I remembered one of Dad’s favorite jokes.

“‘You got your Mexican from your mom and your punk from me,’ he’d say.

“I had the Mexican going on for sure: brown skin and thick brown hair that was lighter than Mom’s but darker than Dad’s that I usually wore in two braids. I had Mom’s dark eyes too. My punk, on the other hand, was terribly lacking.”  (from The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Pérez)

 

ROW books for March means The First Rule of Punk and other terrific titles. Check them out below!

2018-2019 bookmarks

 

“‘Dreams get caught in the webs woven in your bones. That’s where they live. In that marrow there.’ … I imagined spiderwebs in my bones and turned my palms towards the moon, watching the ballet of bones between my elbow and wrist twist to make it so. I saw webs clotted with dreams like fat flies. I wondered if the horses I’d ridden into this dawn were still caught in there like bugs, winnying at the shift.” (from The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimalene)

 

Learn more about The Marrow Thieves other ROW titles for February with the links below.

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

“Nine quarters.

“They were the last of what had been left in the jar of laundry money that Dixie and I kept in our room, the jar that had never quite lost the smell of pickle relish. I counted and recounted the quarters in my pocket with my fingertips as the lunch line moved forward, as I’d counted and recounted them through English, physiology, and government. I counted because things in my life had a way of disappearing on me, and I’d learned not to trust what I thought was there.” (from Gem & Dixie by Sara Zarr)

 

Click on the links below to find out more about Gem & Dixie and our other ROW books for January.

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

“All Clayton wanted was a twelve-bar solo–not even the twice-around the block solo that the other Bluesman played. He wanted twelve bars and to be a true bluesman among bluesman. Didn’t Cool Papa tell the crowd earlier that the blues was more than a song, it was a story?” (from Clayton Byrd Goes Underground by Rita Williams-Garcia)

 

Add Clayton Byrd Goes Underground and other ROW December titles to your end-of-the-year reading list. You can find out more about them by clicking on the links below.

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

“Tonight, when we are all home, Dad will put rice in the cooker, and Mom will fry the fish on both sides until they are crispy. I will bring out the jar of fish sauce that has flecks of chili pepper and carrots floating on top.

“At the table, my brothers and sisters will tell funny stories. Mom will ask about their homework. Dad will nod and smile and eat with his eyes half closed. ‘Good fish,’ he will say to me.”  (from A Different Pond by Bao Phi)

Find out more about A Different Pond and our other ROW November titles below!

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

 

“Herbert was not sure about Halloween.” (From Herbert’s First Halloween by Cynthia Rylant.)

Find out more about Herbert’s First Halloween and other October ROW titles below!

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

“Miss Knapp says the /
first day is Get-Aquainted Day
in kindergarten.”

(from “Drawing My Family” in A New School Year: Stories in Six Voices by Sally Derby.

 

September brings back-to-school and the first hint of autumn. It also brings another year Read On Wisconsin! Check out A New School Year and our other titles for September below.

2018-2019 Bookmarks

 

 

Intermediate Summer 2019 (3)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Summer - (Comments Off on Intermediate Summer 2019 (3))

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Yang, Gene Luen. Prime Baby. Illustrated by Derek Kirk Kim. Roaring Brook Press, 2010. 64 pages 
( 9781596436121)

Age 9 and older

Eight-year-old Thaddeus is jealous of his new baby sister, Maddie, and wants nothing to do with her until he realizes she’s a gateway for an alien invasion. His first clue: her single syllable babble (“ga”) is always vocalized in strings of prime numbers. When the aliens finally emerge—from small pods Maddie throws up–they turn out to be “missionaries of smiles and happy feelings.” This is a disappointment to Thaddeus, while the government locks Maddie away regardless. Thaddeus is more than willing to exploit his parent’s resulting distress for personal gain. But then he recognizes the look on his sister’s face in her isolation room as one all too familiar to him: loneliness. First published in the New York Times Magazine, Gene Luen Yang’s smart, funny graphic novel is hilarious from its first page (“my mother’s womb is a Trojan horse”) to its last. Smiles and happy feelings indeed.  ©2010 Cooperative Children’s Book Center

Intermediate Summer 2019 (2)

August 1st, 2018 | Posted by schliesman in 2018-2019 | 2018-2019 Intermediate | Intermediate (Grades 3-5) | Summer - (Comments Off on Intermediate Summer 2019 (2))

book cover
Love
Ann and Jane Drake. The Kids’ Book of the Night Sky. Illustrated by Heather Collins. Kids Can Press, 2004. 144 pages (0-55337-357-X)

Ages 7 – 12

This compendium of facts, folklore, and hands-on activities will delight young stargazers and provide them with a wealth of information about astronomy. Chapters on the moon, the stars, the planets, and the sky in each season all suggest something to make, from a planisphere to a star clock, and/or do, from a celestial scavenger hunt to a game of Night Sky “I Spy.” (Younger children will need help with some of the activities, but there is enough variety to offer something for children of many ages.) The authors’ fresh, lively narrative offers up plenty of science along with brief, breezy versions of traditional lore from peoples around the world. The clear, concise information is never confused by its juxtaposition with folklore or by the humorous contexts in which it is sometimes presented (such as the interview with an aging star). The two-color artwork in blue and black is often unremarkable, but works well when it matters here – diagramming a project, or showing specific information about aspects of the night sky. © Cooperative Children’s Book Center

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